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Longer-Term Effects of Head Start

Author

Listed:
  • Eliana Garces
  • Duncan Thomas
  • Janet Currie

Abstract

Specially collected data on adults in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are used to provide evidence on the longer-term effects of Head Start, an early intervention program for poor preschool-age children. Whites who attended Head Start are, relative to their siblings who did not, significantly more likely to complete high school, attend college, and possibly have higher earnings in their early twenties. African-Americans who participated in Head Start are less likely to have been booked or charged with a crime. There is some evidence of positive spillovers from older Head Start children to their younger siblings. (JEL J24, I38)

Suggested Citation

  • Eliana Garces & Duncan Thomas & Janet Currie, 2002. "Longer-Term Effects of Head Start," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 999-1012, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:92:y:2002:i:4:p:999-1012
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/00028280260344560
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Currie, Janet & Thomas, Duncan, 1999. "Does Head Start help hispanic children?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 235-262, November.
    2. Currie, Janet & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Does Head Start Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 341-364, June.
    3. Janet Currie, 2001. "Early Childhood Education Programs," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 213-238, Spring.
    4. J. A. Temple & A. J. Reynolds & W. T. Miedel, "undated". "Can Early Intervention Prevent High School Dropout? Evidence from the Chicago Child-Parent Centers," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1180-98, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • D69 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Other

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