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Effects of Universal Child Care Participation on Pre-teen Skills and Risky Behaviors

Listed author(s):
  • Nabanita Datta Gupta

    (ASB, Aarhus University, Denmark)

  • Marianne Simonsen

    ()

    (School of Economics and Management, Aarhus University, Denmark)

This paper uses a Danish panel data child survey merged with administrative records along with a pseudo-experiment that generates variation in the take-up of preschool across municipalities to investigate pre-teenage effects of child care participation at age three (either parental care, preschool, or more informal family day care) in a regime with large scale publicly provided universal care. As outcomes, we consider measures of overall and risky behavior in addition to objective and self-evaluated abilities. We find that eleven-year-old children who have been in non-parental care at age three perform just as well as children who have been in parental care. Furthermore, there is no evidence that one type of non-parental care outperforms the other.

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File URL: ftp://ftp.econ.au.dk/afn/wp/10/wp10_07.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University in its series Economics Working Papers with number 2010-07.

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Length: 45
Date of creation: 07 Jun 2010
Handle: RePEc:aah:aarhec:2010-07
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.econ.au.dk/afn/

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