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Education-Oriented and Care-Oriented Preschools:Implications on Child Development

Author

Listed:
  • Hideo Akabayashi

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)

  • TIm Ruberg

    (Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim)

  • Chizuru Shikishima

    (Department of Psychology, Teikyo University)

  • Jun Yamashita

    (Faculty of Integrated Arts and Social Sciences, Japan Women's University)

Abstract

This paper estimates the causal effect of education-oriented vs. care-oriented preschools on child development. We use a unique quasi-experiment from Japan that exploits plausibly exogenous regional and temporal variation in the relative availability of different preschools. We find that attendance at an education-oriented preschool is associated with significant improvements in mathematical and linguistic achievement that manifest later in adolescence. Positive effects can also be found for socioemotional measures. Ascending marginal treatment effect (MTE) curves suggest an inverse selection pattern: children that are least likely to enroll in the education-oriented preschool gain the most from it. This heterogeneity is mainly due to specific features of education-oriented preschools (i.e., educational orientation, shorter operating hours, and peer effects), while gains from enrollment in care-oriented preschools appear more homogeneous.

Suggested Citation

  • Hideo Akabayashi & TIm Ruberg & Chizuru Shikishima & Jun Yamashita, 2023. "Education-Oriented and Care-Oriented Preschools:Implications on Child Development," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2023-009, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2023-009
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Early childhood education and care; Child development; IV methods; Marginal treatment effect;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C26 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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