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Does education improve health? A reexamination of the evidence from compulsory schooling laws

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  • Bhashkar Mazumder

Abstract

This article analyzes the impact of compulsory schooling laws early in the twentieth century on long-term health. The author finds no compelling evidence for a causal link between education and health using this research design. Further, the results suggest that only a small fraction of health conditions are affected by education, and several of those are conditions, such as sight and hearing, where economic theories don?t appear to be relevant.

Suggested Citation

  • Bhashkar Mazumder, 2008. "Does education improve health? A reexamination of the evidence from compulsory schooling laws," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 32(Q II), pages 2-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2008:i:qii:p:2-16:n:v.32no.2
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    2. Claudia Goldin & Lawrence Katz, 2003. "Mass Secondary Schooling and the State," NBER Working Papers 10075, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Dana P. Goldman & James P. Smith, 2004. "Can Patient Self-Management Help Explain the SES Health Gradient?," HEW 0403004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Daron Acemoglu & Joshua Angrist, 2001. "How Large are Human-Capital Externalities? Evidence from Compulsory-Schooling Laws," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2000, Volume 15, pages 9-74, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Grossman, Michael, 2006. "Education and Nonmarket Outcomes," Handbook of the Economics of Education, in: Erik Hanushek & F. Welch (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Education, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 10, pages 577-633, Elsevier.
    6. Leigh, J. Paul & Dhir, Rachna, 1997. "Schooling and frailty among seniors," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 45-57, February.
    7. Johnson Rucker C & Schoeni Robert F, 2011. "The Influence of Early-Life Events on Human Capital, Health Status, and Labor Market Outcomes Over the Life Course," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(3), pages 1-57, September.
    8. repec:cdl:indrel:243315 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Keywords

    Education - Economic aspects; Health;

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