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The causal relationship between education, health and health related behaviour: Evidence from a natural experiment in England

  • Braakmann, Nils

I exploit exogenous variation in the likelihood to obtain any sort of educational qualification between January- and February-born individuals for 13 academic cohorts in England. For these cohorts compulsory schooling laws interacted with the timing of the CSE and O-level exams to change the probability of obtaining a qualification by around 2-3 percentage points. I then use data on individuals born in these two months from the British Labour Force Survey and the Health Survey for England to investigate the effects of education on health using being February-born as an instrument for education. The results indicate neither an effect of education on various health related measures nor an effect on health related behaviour, e.g., smoking, drinking or eating various types of food.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 753-763

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:4:p:753-763
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

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