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Cognitive and Noncognitive Peer Effects in Early Education

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew Neidell

    (Columbia University and NBER)

  • Jane Waldfogel

    (Columbia University)

Abstract

We examine peer effects in early education by estimating value-added models with school fixed effects that control extensively for individual, family, peer, and teacher characteristics to account for the endogeneity of peer group formation. We find statistically significant and robust spillover effects from preschool on math and reading outcomes, but statistically insignificant effects on various behavioral and social outcomes. We also find that peer externalizing problems, which most likely capture classroom disturbance, hinder cognitive outcomes. Our estimates imply that ignoring spillover effects significantly understates the social returns to preschool. © 2010 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew Neidell & Jane Waldfogel, 2010. "Cognitive and Noncognitive Peer Effects in Early Education," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(3), pages 562-576, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:92:y:2010:i:3:p:562-576
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eisenkopf, Gerald & Hessami, Zohal & Fischbacher, Urs & Ursprung, Heinrich W., 2015. "Academic performance and single-sex schooling: Evidence from a natural experiment in Switzerland," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 115(C), pages 123-143.
    2. Jones, Sam, 2016. "How does classroom composition affect learning outcomes in Ugandan primary schools?," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 66-78.
    3. Schindler, Dirk & Schjelderup, Guttorm, 2012. "Debt shifting and ownership structure," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 635-647.
    4. Murguia Baysse, Juan Manuel, 2013. "Essays on agricultural, financial economics and education," ISU General Staff Papers 201301010800004458, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    5. repec:bla:jorssa:v:180:y:2017:i:2:p:475-502 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ahn, Tom & Trogdon, Justin G., 2017. "Peer delinquency and student achievement in middle school," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 192-217.
    7. Christina Felfe & Martin Huber, 2017. "Does preschool boost the development of minority children?: the case of Roma children," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 180(2), pages 475-502, February.
    8. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:58:y:2017:i:c:p:15-31 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Matthew Calver, 2015. "Closing the Aboriginal Education Gap in Canada: Assessing Progress and Estimating the Economic Benefits," CSLS Research Reports 2015-03, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    10. Feng, Han & Li, Jiayao, 2016. "Head teachers, peer effects, and student achievement," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 268-283.
    11. Arteaga, Irma & Humpage, Sarah & Reynolds, Arthur J. & Temple, Judy A., 2014. "One year of preschool or two: Is it important for adult outcomes?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 221-237.
    12. Horoi, Irina & Ost, Ben, 2015. "Disruptive peers and the estimation of teacher value added," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 180-192.
    13. Pedro N. Silva & John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf, 2012. "The impact of sampling variation on peer measures: a comment on a proposal to adjust estimates for measurement error," DoQSS Working Papers 12-12, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.

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