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Does delaying kindergarten entrance give children a head start?

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  • Datar, Ashlesha

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  • Datar, Ashlesha, 2006. "Does delaying kindergarten entrance give children a head start?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 43-62, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:25:y:2006:i:1:p:43-62
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    1. Goldman D. P. & Bhattacharya J. & McCaffrey D. F. & Duan N. & Leibowitz A. A. & Joyce G. F. & Morton S. C., 2001. "Effect of Insurance on Mortality in an HIV-Positive Population in Care," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 96, pages 883-894, September.
    2. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2001. "The effect of grade retention on educational and labor market outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 563-576, December.
    3. Evans, William N. & Ringel, Jeanne S., 1999. "Can higher cigarette taxes improve birth outcomes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 135-154, April.
    4. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Keueger, 1991. "Does Compulsory School Attendance Affect Schooling and Earnings?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(4), pages 979-1014.
    5. Connolly, Sara & Micklewright, John & Nickell, Stephen, 1992. "The Occupational Success of Young Men Who Left School at Sixteen," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(3), pages 460-479, July.
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