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Late Start with Extra Schooling: The Effect of School Entry-Age Increase and the Introduction of Preparatory Year

Author

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  • Nikhil Jha

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the combined effect of school entry-age increase and the introduction of preparatory year (pre-school) on educational achievement using a difference-in-difference specification. Achievement is assessed using the score on national standardized tests across a range of subjects. The analysis uses the change in state policy across two states in Australia to estimate the effect. Policies were enacted in different years and affect different cohorts. I find positive effects for several subjects across different grades. Results are robust to falsification tests. However, cohorts starting school during the policy implementation period seem to have been adversely affected.

Suggested Citation

  • Nikhil Jha, 2014. "Late Start with Extra Schooling: The Effect of School Entry-Age Increase and the Introduction of Preparatory Year," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2014n10, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  • Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2014n10
    as

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    File URL: http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/downloads/working_paper_series/wp2014n10.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational achievement; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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