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Until when does the effect of age on academic achievement persist? Evidence from Korean data

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  • Nam, Kigon

Abstract

According to an analysis of Korean student panel survey data, monthly differences in age had a significant influence on academic achievement until middle school (lower secondary education). However, this age effect did not persist when students graduated from high school (upper secondary education). Furthermore, some evidence is found that younger students, upon entering high school, were more likely to concentrate on academic studies, and less likely to experience minor distractions, thereby compensating for their poor academic achievement in middle school.

Suggested Citation

  • Nam, Kigon, 2014. "Until when does the effect of age on academic achievement persist? Evidence from Korean data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 106-122.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:40:y:2014:i:c:p:106-122
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2014.02.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Abdulmumini Baba Alfa & Abdulmumini Baba Alfa & Mohd Zaini Abd Karim, 2016. "Student Enthusiasm as a Key Determinant of their Performance," International Review of Management and Marketing, Econjournals, vol. 6(2), pages 237-245.
    2. Herbst, Mikołaj & Strawiński, Paweł, 2016. "Early effects of an early start: Evidence from lowering the school starting age in Poland," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 256-271.
    3. Martins, Luis & Pereira, Manuel C, 2017. "Disentangling the channels from birthdate to educational attainment," MPRA Paper 80607, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 04 Aug 2017.
    4. Peña, Pablo A., 2017. "Creating winners and losers: Date of birth, relative age in school, and outcomes in childhood and adulthood," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 152-176.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    School entry age; Relative age effect; Academic achievement; Instrument variable;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C26 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

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