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Returns To Schooling: Skills Accumulation Or Information Revelation?

Author

Listed:
  • Steven F. Koch

    () (Department of Economics, University of Pretoria)

  • S. Ssekabira Ntege

    () (Department of Transportation, South Africa)

Abstract

This paper explores the degree to which imperfect information in the labour market regarding worker quality is likely to impact employment opportunities, as well as the wages associated with those opportunities. The primary purpose of this paper is to provide preliminary empirical evidence that market imperfections exist in South Africa's labour market, that those imperfections could be based on asymmetric private information, and that market participants pursue information gathering and revelation strategies to help mitigate the negative effects of the information asymmetries.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven F. Koch & S. Ssekabira Ntege, 2008. "Returns To Schooling: Skills Accumulation Or Information Revelation?," Working Papers 200812, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:pre:wpaper:200812
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Wittenberg, 2007. "Dissecting post-apartheid labour market developments: Decomposing a discrete choice model while dealing with unobservables," Working Papers 46, Economic Research Southern Africa.
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    4. Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1992. "Study duration and earnings: A test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 223-228, October.
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    14. Schmertmann, Carl P., 1994. "Selectivity bias correction methods in polychotomous sample selection models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 101-132.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nnaemeka Chukwuone & Ebele Amaechina & Sunday Emeka Enebeli-Uzor & Evelyn Iyoko & Benjamin Okpukpara, 2012. "Analysis of Impact of Remittance on Poverty in Nigeria," Working Papers PMMA 2012-09, PEP-PMMA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Information asymmetry; signalling; screening; returns education;

    JEL classification:

    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D82 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Asymmetric and Private Information; Mechanism Design
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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