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Education and employment status: a test of the strong screening hypothesis in Italy

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  • Brown, Sarah
  • Sessions, John G.

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  • Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G., 1999. "Education and employment status: a test of the strong screening hypothesis in Italy," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 397-404, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:18:y:1999:i:4:p:397-404
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Katz, Eliakim & Ziderman, Adrian, 1980. "On education, screening and human capital," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 81-88.
    2. Miller, Paul W & Volker, Paul A, 1984. "The Screening Hypothesis: An Application of the Wiles Test," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(1), pages 121-127, January.
    3. Layard, Richard & Psacharopoulos, George, 1974. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Education," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(5), pages 985-998, Sept./Oct.
    4. Arrow, Kenneth J., 1973. "Higher education as a filter," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 193-216, July.
    5. Grubb, W. Norton, 1993. "Further tests of screening on education and observed ability," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 125-136, June.
    6. Sicherman, Nachum, 1991. ""Overeducation" in the Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 101-122, April.
    7. Arabsheibani, Gholamreza, 1989. "The wiles test revisited," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 361-364.
    8. Lee, Kiong-Hock, 1980. "Screening, ability, and the productivity of education in Malaysia," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 189-193.
    9. Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1977. "Education and Screening," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(5), pages 949-958, December.
    10. Liu, Pak-Wai & Wong, Yue-Chim, 1982. "Educational Screening by Certificates: An Empirical Test," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 20(1), pages 72-83, January.
    11. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, January.
    12. Lang, Kevin, 1994. "Does the Human-Capital/Educational-Sorting Debate Matter for Development Policy?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 353-358, March.
    13. Bardasi, E. & Monfardini, C., 1997. "The Choice of the Working Sector in Italy," Economics Working Papers eco97/09, European University Institute.
    14. Lazear, Edward, 1977. "Academic Achievement and Job Performance: Note," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 252-254, March.
    15. Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1992. "Study duration and earnings: A test in relation to the human capital versus screening debate," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 223-228, October.
    16. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-512, March.
    17. Albrecht, James W., 1981. "A procedure for testing the signalling hypothesis," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 123-132, February.
    18. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    19. Tucker, Irvin III, 1986. "Evidence on the weak and the strong versions of the screening hypothesis in the United States," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 391-394.
    20. Psacharopoulos, George, 1979. "On the weak versus the strong version of the screening hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 181-185.
    21. Shah, Anup, 1985. "Does Education Act as a Screening Device for Certain British Occupations?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(1), pages 118-124, March.
    22. Riley, John G, 1979. "Testing the Educational Screening Hypothesis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(5), pages 227-252, October.
    23. Fredland, J. Eric & Little, Roger D., 1981. "Self-employed workers: Returns to education and training," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 1(3), pages 315-337, June.
    24. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
    25. Andrew Weiss, 1995. "Human Capital vs. Signalling Explanations of Wages," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 133-154, Fall.
    26. Groot, Wim & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 1994. "Earnings Effects of Different Components of Schooling: Human Capital versus Screening," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 317-321, May.
    27. Cohn, Elchanan & Kiker, B. F. & De Oliveira, M. Mendes, 1987. "Further evidence on the screening hypothesis," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 289-294.
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    Cited by:

    1. Carolina Castagnetti & Luisa Rosti, 2011. "Who skims the cream of the Italian graduate crop? Wage employment versus self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 223-234, February.
    2. Fossen, Frank M. & Büttner, Tobias J.M., 2013. "The returns to education for opportunity entrepreneurs, necessity entrepreneurs, and paid employees," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 66-84.
    3. Wallace, Michael T. & Jack, Claire G., 2011. "On‐Farm and Off‐Farm Returns to Education among Farm Operators in Northern Ireland," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108786, Agricultural Economics Society.
    4. Arnaud Chevalier & Colm Harmon & Ian Walker & Yu Zhu, 2004. "Does Education Raise Productivity, or Just Reflect it?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(499), pages 499-517, November.
    5. Hornig, Stephan O. & Rottmann, Horst & Wapler, Rüdiger, 2009. "Information asymmetry, education signals and the case of Ethnic and Native Germans," IAB Discussion Paper 200914, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. Carolina Castagnetti & Silvia Dal Bianco & Luisa Rosti, 2011. "Shortening university career fades the signal away. Evidence from Italy," Quaderni di Dipartimento 146, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    7. Luisa Rosti & Chikara Yamaguchi & Carolina Castagnetti, 2005. "Educational Performance as Signalling Device: Evidence from Italy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(4), pages 1-7.
    8. Miller, Paul W. & Mulvey, Charles & Martin, Nick, 2004. "A test of the sorting model of education in Australia," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 473-482, October.
    9. Abbi Kedir & Andri Kyrizi & Francisco Martinez-Mora, 2012. "Signalling and Productivity Effects of Overeducation: Is It Really a Waste of Resources?," Discussion Papers in Economics 12/19, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    10. Castagnetti, Carolina & Rosti, Luisa, 2009. "Effort allocation in tournaments: The effect of gender on academic performance in Italian universities," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 357-369, June.
    11. Inmaculada García-Mainar & Víctor M. Montuenga-Gómez, 2017. "Subjective educational mismatch and signalling in Spain," Documentos de Trabajo dt2017-03, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    12. Lili Kang & Fei Peng, 2012. "A selection analysis of returns to education in China," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 535-554, March.
    13. Oppedisano, Veruska, 2014. "Higher education expansion and unskilled labour market outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 205-220.
    14. Harry Anthony Patrinos & Maria Paula Savanti, 2014. "The Screening Hypothesis and the Returns to Schooling in Argentina," Research in Applied Economics, Macrothink Institute, vol. 6(3), pages 28-42, September.
    15. Steve F Koch & Ssekabira Ntege, 2008. "Returns to Schooling: Skills Accumulation or Information Revelation?," Working Papers 87, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    16. Adamopoulou, Effrosyni & Tanzi, Giulia M., 2014. "Academic Performance and the Great Recession," MPRA Paper 54913, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Hussey, Andrew, 2012. "Human capital augmentation versus the signaling value of MBA education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 442-451.
    18. SWATI Sharma, 2016. "Does Education Determine Employment: Peculiarities Of The Indian Labour Market," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 11(1), pages 164-180, April.
    19. Andrey Aistov, 2012. "Is Education a Signal on the Russian Labour Market?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 05/EDU/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    20. repec:ucn:wpaper:10197/1104 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Miller, Ana Corina & Jack, Claire G. & Anderson, Duncan J., 2014. "An exploration of the factors influencing well-being of farm and non-farm households," 88th Annual Conference, April 9-11, 2014, AgroParisTech, Paris, France 169732, Agricultural Economics Society.
    22. Carolina Castagnetti & Luisa Rosti, 2010. "The Gender Gap in Academic Achievements of Italian Graduates," Quaderni di Dipartimento 118, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    23. Andrew Clark, 2000. "Signalling and Screening in a Transition Economy: Three Empirical Models Applied to Russia," CERT Discussion Papers 0003, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    24. Nohora Y. Forero Ramírez & Manuel Ramírez Gómez, 2008. "Determinantes de los ingresos laborales de los graduados universitarios durante el período 2001-2004," DOCUMENTOS DE TRABAJO 004591, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO.

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