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Upward Bias in the Estimated Returns to Education: Evidence from South Africa

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  • Thomas Hertz

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Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Hertz, 2003. "Upward Bias in the Estimated Returns to Education: Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(4), pages 1354-1368, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:93:y:2003:i:4:p:1354-1368
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282803769206331
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gundersen, Sara, 2016. "Disappointing returns to education in Ghana: A test of the robustness of OLS estimates using propensity score matching," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 74-89.
    2. Steven F. Koch & S. Ssekabira Ntege, 2008. "Returns To Schooling: Skills Accumulation Or Information Revelation?," Working Papers 200812, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Monazza Aslam, 2006. "Rates of Return to Education by Gender in Pakistan," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-064, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Patrick Duff & David Fryer, 2005. "Market Failure, Human Capital, and Job Search Dynamics in South Africa: The Case of Duncan Village," Working Papers 05098, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
    5. Seema Jayachandran & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2009. "Life Expectancy and Human Capital Investments: Evidence from Maternal Mortality Declines," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(1), pages 349-397.
    6. Hongbin Li & Pak Wai Liu & Ning Ma & Junsen Zhang, 2005. "Does Education Pay in Urban China? Estimating Returns to Education Using Twins," Discussion Papers 00013, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Economics.
    7. Nicola Branson & Clare Hofmeyr & David Lam, 2014. "Progress through school and the determinants of school dropout in South Africa," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 106-126, January.
    8. Li, Hongbin & Liu, Pak Wai & Zhang, Junsen, 2012. "Estimating returns to education using twins in urban China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 97(2), pages 494-504.
    9. Martine Mariotti & Juergen Meinecke, 2011. "Bounds on the Return to Education in Australia using Ability Bias," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-551, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    10. Peter Ebbes & Michel Wedel & Ulf Böckenholt & Ton Steerneman, 2005. "Solving and Testing for Regressor-Error (in)Dependence When no Instrumental Variables are Available: With New Evidence for the Effect of Education on Income," Quantitative Marketing and Economics (QME), Springer, vol. 3(4), pages 365-392, December.
    11. Salisbury, Taylor, 2016. "Education and inequality in South Africa: Returns to schooling in the post-apartheid era," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 43-52.
    12. Jorge M. Agüero & Prashant Bharadwaj, 2014. "Do the More Educated Know More about Health? Evidence from Schooling and HIV Knowledge in Zimbabwe," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(3), pages 489-517.
    13. Monazza Aslam, 2009. "Education Gender Gaps in Pakistan: Is the Labor Market to Blame?," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(4), pages 747-784, July.

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