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Computer können das Lernen behindern

  • Thomas Fuchs

    ()

  • Ludger Wößmann

    ()

Die Forderung, alle »Schulen ans Netz« zu bringen, ist in der öffentlichen Diskussion weit verbreitet, und in den politischen Bestrebungen zu ihrer Umsetzung werden erhebliche finanzielle Mittel aufgewendet. Gleichzeitig wenden viele Eltern eine Menge Geld auf, um ihren Kindern zu Hause die besten Computer und die neueste Lernsoftware bieten zu können. Dies alles geschieht in der Hoffnung, die Bildungschancen der Schülerinnen und Schüler zu verbessern. Umfangreiche Analysen der internationalen PISA-Daten deuten aber darauf hin, dass diese Hoffnung weitgehend vergebens ist. Die Verfügbarkeit von Computern zu Hause und die intensive Nutzung von Computern in der Schule gehen nicht mit besseren, sondern zumeist sogar mit schlechteren Schülerleistungen in den PISA-Basiskompetenzen einher. Damit zeigt sich wie schon für die in der letzten Ausgabe des ifo Schnelldienst betrachtete Verkleinerung der Klassengrößen, dass das Heil der deutschen Bildungspolitik wohl nicht in einer kostenintensiven Politik der Ausweitung der in den Schulen verfügbaren materiellen Ressourcen zu suchen ist. Mehr versprechen da schon die in den nächsten beiden Ausgaben des ifo Schnelldienst in den weiteren Folgen der Serie »Ökonomische Beiträge zur Schuldebatte« untersuchten instiutionellen Reformen des Schulsystems.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/ZS/ZS-ifo_Schnelldienst/zs-sd-2005/ifosd_2005_18_3.pdf
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Article provided by Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its journal ifo Schnelldienst.

Volume (Year): 58 (2005)
Issue (Month): 18 (09)
Pages: 16-23

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Handle: RePEc:ces:ifosdt:v:58:y:2005:i:18:p:16-23
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  1. Joseph G. Altonji & Charles R. Pierret, . "Employer Learning and Statistical Discrimination," IPR working papers 97-18, Institute for Policy Resarch at Northwestern University.
  2. H, Entorf & Michel Gollac & Francis Kramarz, 1997. "New Technologies, Wages and Worker Selection," Working Papers 97-25, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
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  4. Rouse, Cecilia Elena & Krueger, Alan B., 2004. "Putting computerized instruction to the test: a randomized evaluation of a "scientifically based" reading program," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 323-338, August.
  5. Thomas Fuchs & Ludger Wossmann, 2004. "Computers and student learning: bivariate and multivariate evidence on the availability and use of computers at home and at school," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(3-4), pages 359-386.
  6. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy, 2002. "New Evidence on Classroom Computers and Pupil Learning," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 735-765, October.
  7. Bishop, John Hillman, 1989. "Is the Test Score Decline Responsible for the Productivity Growth Decline?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 178-97, March.
  8. Bishop, John, 1992. "The impact of academic competencies on wages, unemployment, and job performance," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 127-194, December.
  9. Borghans, Lex & ter Weel, Bas, 2003. "Are Computer Skills the New Basic Skills? The Returns to Computer, Writing and Math Skills in Britain," IZA Discussion Papers 751, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. DiNardo, John E & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1997. "The Returns to Computer Use Revisited: Have Pencils Changed the Wage Structure Too?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(1), pages 291-303, February.
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