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LinkedIn(to) Job Opportunities: Experimental Evidence from Job Readiness Training

Author

Listed:
  • Wheeler, Laurel

    () (University of Alberta, Department of Economics)

  • Garlick, Robert

    () (Duke University)

  • Johnson, Eric

    () (RTI International)

  • Shaw, Patrick

    () (RTI International)

  • Gargano, Marissa

    () (RTI International)

Abstract

Online professional networking platforms are widely used and offer the prospect of alleviating labor market frictions. We run the first randomized evaluation of training workseekers to join one of these platforms. Training increases employment at the end of the program from 70 to 77% and this effect persists for at least twelve months. Treatment effects on platform use explain most of the treatment effect on employment. Administrative data suggest that platform use increases employment by providing information to prospective employers and to workseekers. It may also facilitate referrals but does not reduce job search costs or change self-beliefs.

Suggested Citation

  • Wheeler, Laurel & Garlick, Robert & Johnson, Eric & Shaw, Patrick & Gargano, Marissa, 2019. "LinkedIn(to) Job Opportunities: Experimental Evidence from Job Readiness Training," Working Papers 2019-14, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:albaec:2019_014
    as

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    File URL: https://sites.ualberta.ca/~econwps/2019/wp2019-14.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    employment; information frictions; online platforms; social networks; field experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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