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Digital Labor-Market Intermediation and Job Expectations: Evidence from a Field Experiment

Author

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  • Dammert, Ana C.

    () (Carleton University)

  • Galdo, Jose C.

    () (Carleton University)

  • Galdo, Virgilio

    () (World Bank)

Abstract

Subjective expectations are fundamental for understanding individual behavior. Yet, little is known about how individuals use new information to formulate and update their subjective expectations. In this study, we exploit data from a multi-treatment field experiment to investigate how job-market information sent to jobseekers via short text messages (SMS) influence subjective job gain expectations in Peru. Results show that jobseekers who received digital intermediation based on a large information set increased their before-after job gain expectations relative to the control group. Independently of the information channel, no significant effects were found when labor-market intermediation is based on a restricted (short) set of information.

Suggested Citation

  • Dammert, Ana C. & Galdo, Jose C. & Galdo, Virgilio, 2013. "Digital Labor-Market Intermediation and Job Expectations: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 7395, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7395
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    14. repec:feb:artefa:0109 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Ana Dammert & Jose Galdo & Virgilio Galdo, 2015. "Integrating mobile phone technologies into labor-market intermediation: a multi-treatment experimental design," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, December.
    2. Beam, Emily A., 2016. "Do job fairs matter? Experimental evidence on the impact of job-fair attendance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 32-40.
    3. Crépon, Bruno & van den Berg, Gerard J., 2016. "Active Labor Market Policies," IZA Discussion Papers 10321, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Hübler, Michael & Hartje, Rebecca, 2015. "Smart Phones Support Smart Labor," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-559, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    field experiments; subjective expectations; labor-market intermediation; ICT; Peru;

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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