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Integrating Mobile Phone Technologies into Labor-Market Intermediation: A Multi-Treatment Experimental Design

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  • Dammert, Ana C.

    () (Carleton University)

  • Galdo, Jose C.

    () (Carleton University)

  • Galdo, Virgilio

    () (World Bank)

Abstract

This study investigates the causal impacts of integrating mobile phone technologies into traditional public labor-market intermediation services on employment outcomes. By providing faster, cheaper and up-to-date information on job vacancies via SMS, mobile phone technologies might affect the rate at which offers arrive as well as the probability of receiving a job offer. We implement a social experiment with multiple treatments that allows us to investigate both the role of information channels (digital versus non-digital) and information sets (restricted [public] versus unrestricted [public/private]). The results show positive and significant short-term effects on employment for public labor-market intermediation. While the impacts from traditional labor-market intermediation are not large enough to be statistically significant, the unrestricted digital treatment group shows statistically significant short-term employment effects. As for potential matching efficiency gains, the results suggest no statistically significant effects associated with either information channels or information sets.

Suggested Citation

  • Dammert, Ana C. & Galdo, Jose C. & Galdo, Virgilio, 2015. "Integrating Mobile Phone Technologies into Labor-Market Intermediation: A Multi-Treatment Experimental Design," IZA Discussion Papers 9012, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9012
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    Cited by:

    1. Escudero, Verónica & Kluve, Jochen & López Mourelo, Elva & Pignatti, Clemente, 2017. "Active labour market programmes in Latin America and the Caribbean: Evicence from a meta analysis," Ruhr Economic Papers 715, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. repec:oup:wbrobs:v:32:y:2017:i:2:p:127-154. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Abebe, Girum & Caria, Stefano & Fafchamps, Marcel & Falco, Paolo & Franklin, Simon & Quinn, Simon & Shilpi, Forhad, 2017. "Matching firms and workers in a field experiment in Ethiopia," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86572, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Beam, Emily A., 2016. "Do job fairs matter? Experimental evidence on the impact of job-fair attendance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(C), pages 32-40.
    5. David McKenzie, 2017. "How Effective Are Active Labor Market Policies in Developing Countries? A Critical Review of Recent Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 32(2), pages 127-154.
    6. Escudero, Verónica. & Kluve, Jochen. & López Mourelo, Elva. & Pignatti, Clemente., 2017. "Active labour market programmes in Latin America and the Caribbean evidence from a meta analysis," ILO Working Papers 994987491702676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Abebe, Girum & Caria, Stefano & Fafchamps, Marcel & Falco, Paolo & Franklin, Simon & Quinn, Simon, 2017. "Anonymity of distance? Job search and labour market exclusion in a growing African city," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86573, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ICT; labor-market intermediation; mobile phones; field experiments; Peru;

    JEL classification:

    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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