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The State of Knowledge on the Role and Impact of Labour Market Information: A Survey of the International Evidence

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  • Alexander Murray

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Abstract

This report provides a critical examination of the international literature on the role and impact of labour market information (LMI). The purpose of this exercise is to assess the current state of knowledge on the role and impact of LMI and to identify gaps in our knowledge. The report finds that we know very little about the impact of LMI per se on labour market outcomes. What knowledge we do possess must be inferred from evaluations of labour market programs or technologies that are related to LMI, such as job-search assistance programs, career counseling, and internet-based LMI. The literature on each of these topics reveals some beneficial impacts on labour market outcomes, but the precise role of LMI in driving these relationships is never specified.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Murray, 2010. "The State of Knowledge on the Role and Impact of Labour Market Information: A Survey of the International Evidence," CSLS Research Reports 2010-05, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
  • Handle: RePEc:sls:resrep:1005
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    File URL: http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2010-05.pdf
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    17. repec:nsr:niesrd:183 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour market; international; labour market information; decision-making; labour market outcomes;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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