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Long-Term Effects of Forced Migration

  • Markus Jäntti
  • Matti Sarvimäki
  • Roope Uusitalo

We study the long-term effects of human displacement using individual level panel data onforced migrants and comparable non-migrants. After World War II, Finland ceded a tenth ofits territory to the Soviet Union and resettled the entire population living in these areas in theremaining parts of the country. We find that displacement increased the long-term income ofmen, but had no effect on that of women. We attribute a large part of the effect to fastertransition from traditional (rural) to modern (urban) occupations among the displaced.

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File URL: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/textonly/SERC/publications/download/sercdp0015.pdf
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Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0015.

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Date of creation: Mar 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0015
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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  1. George J. Borjas, 2001. "Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 69-134.
  2. Florence Kondylis, 2007. "Conflict-Induced Displacement and Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence from Post-War Bosnia and Herzegovina," CEP Discussion Papers dp0777, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Schultz, T Paul, 1971. "Rural-Urban Migration in Colombia," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 53(2), pages 157-63, May.
  4. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Long-Term Educational Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 847-862, June.
  5. Mathias Czaika & Krisztina Kis-Katos, 2007. "Civil Conflict and Displacement: Village-Level Determinants of Forced Migration in Aceh," HiCN Working Papers 32, Households in Conflict Network.
  6. Gottschang, Thomas R, 1987. "Economic Change, Disasters, and Migration: The Historical Case of Manchuria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 461-90, April.
  7. Ibáñez, Ana Mari­a & Vélez, Carlos Eduardo, 2008. "Civil Conflict and Forced Migration: The Micro Determinants and Welfare Losses of Displacement in Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 659-676, April.
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