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Long-term effects of forced migration

Author

Listed:
  • Jäntti, Markus
  • Sarvimäki, Matti
  • Uusitalo, Roope

Abstract

We study the long-term effects of human displacement using individual level panel data on forced migrants and comparable non-migrants. After World War II, Finland ceded a tenth of its territory to the Soviet Union and resettled the entire population living in these areas in the remaining parts of the country. We find that displacement increased the long-term income of men, but had no effect on that of women. We attribute a large part of the effect to faster transition from traditional (rural) to modern (urban) occupations among the displaced.

Suggested Citation

  • Jäntti, Markus & Sarvimäki, Matti & Uusitalo, Roope, 2009. "Long-term effects of forced migration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33616, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:33616
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/33616/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gottschang, Thomas R, 1987. "Economic Change, Disasters, and Migration: The Historical Case of Manchuria," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 461-490, April.
    2. Ibáñez, Ana Mari­a & Vélez, Carlos Eduardo, 2008. "Civil Conflict and Forced Migration: The Micro Determinants and Welfare Losses of Displacement in Colombia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 659-676, April.
    3. George J. Borjas, 2001. "Does Immigration Grease the Wheels of the Labor Market?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 32(1), pages 69-134.
    4. Florence Kondylis, 2007. "Conflict-Induced Displacement and Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence from Post-War Bosnia and Herzegovina," CEP Discussion Papers dp0777, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769.
    6. Mathias Czaika & Krisztina Kis-Katos, 2009. "Civil Conflict and Displacement: Village-Level Determinants of Forced Migration in Aceh," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 46(3), pages 399-418, May.
    7. Joshua Angrist & Eric Bettinger & Michael Kremer, 2006. "Long-Term Educational Consequences of Secondary School Vouchers: Evidence from Administrative Records in Colombia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 847-862, June.
    8. Schultz, T Paul, 1971. "Rural-Urban Migration in Colombia," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 53(2), pages 157-163, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bauer, Thomas K. & Giesecke, Matthias & Janisch, Laura, 2017. "Forced Migration and Mortality," IZA Discussion Papers 11116, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Wang, Shun & Zhou, Weina, 2017. "The Unintended Long-Term Consequences of Mao’s Mass Send-Down Movement: Marriage, Social Network, and Happiness," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 344-359.
    3. Falck Oliver & Heblich Stephan & Link Susanne, 2012. "Forced Migration and the Effects of an Integration Policy in Post-WWII Germany," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-29, May.
    4. Paolo VERME, 2016. "The Economics Of Forced Displacement: An Introduction," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 44, pages 141-163.
    5. Thomas K. Bauer & Sebastian Braun & Michael Kvasnicka, 2013. "The Economic Integration of Forced Migrants: Evidence for Post‐War Germany," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123, pages 998-1024, September.
    6. Alexander Murray, 2010. "The State of Knowledge on the Role and Impact of Labour Market Information: A Survey of the International Evidence," CSLS Research Reports 2010-05, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    7. Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Link, Susanne, 2011. "The Evils of Forced Migration: Do Integration Policies Alleviate Migrants' Economic Situations?," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2011-14, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    8. Ivan Zilic, 2015. "Effects of Forced Displacement on Health," CDL Aging, Health, Labor working papers 2015-08, The Christian Doppler (CD) Laboratory Aging, Health, and the Labor Market, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    9. Semrad, Alexandra, 2015. "Immigration and educational spillovers: evidence from Sudeten German expellees in post-war Bavaria," Discussion Papers in Economics 24851, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    10. Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh & Isabel Ruiz & Carlos Vargas-Silva & Roger Zetter, 2012. "Assessing the Impacts and Costs of Forced Displacement : Volume 1. A Mixed Methods Approach," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16096, The World Bank.
    11. Braun, Sebastian & Kvasnicka, Michael, 2014. "Immigration and structural change: Evidence from post-war Germany," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 253-269.
    12. Karol Jan Borowiecki, 2012. "Are composers different? Historical evidence on conflict-induced migration (1816-1997)," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(3), pages 270-291, August.
    13. Christoph Eder, 2014. "Displacement and education of the next generation: evidence from Bosnia and Herzegovina," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
    14. Aki Kangasharju & Matti Sarvimäki, 2010. "Self-Reinforcing Shocks: Evidence from a Resettlement Policy," SERC Discussion Papers 0047, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    15. Isabel Ruiz & Carlos Vargas-Silva, 2013. "The Economics of Forced Migration," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 772-784, June.
    16. Stephan Thomsen, 2009. "Job Search Assistance Programs in Europe: Evaluation Methods and Recent Empirical Findings," FEMM Working Papers 09018, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Faculty of Economics and Management.
    17. Patrick A. Puhani, 2015. "Employment industry and occupational continuity in Germany: from the Nazi regime to the post-war economic miracle," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(8), pages 603-612, May.
    18. repec:jku:cdlwps:2015_08 is not listed on IDEAS

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    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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