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The Evils of Forced Migration: Do Integration Policies Alleviate Migrants' Economic Situations?

  • Falck, Oliver
  • Heblich, Stephan
  • Link, Susanne

Armed conflicts, natural disasters and infrastructure projects continue to force millions into migration. This is especially true for developing countries. After World War II, about 8 million ethnic Germans experienced a similar situation when forced to leave their homelands and settle within the new borders of West Germany. Subsequently, a law was introduced to foster their labor market integration. We evaluate the success of this law using unique retrospective individual-level panel data. We find that the law improved expellees' overall situation but failed to restore their pre-war occupation status. This holds implications for the design of integration policies today.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3181
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Paper provided by University of Stirling, Division of Economics in its series Stirling Economics Discussion Papers with number 2011-14.

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Date of creation: Jul 2011
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Handle: RePEc:stl:stledp:2011-14
Contact details of provider: Postal: Division of Economics, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland FK9 4LA
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Web page: http://www.econ.stir.ac.uk/
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  1. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Marc Schramm, 2004. "The strategic bombing of German cities during World War II and its impact on city growth," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 201-218, April.
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  6. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
  7. Prema-chandra Athukorala & Budy P. Resosudarmo, 2005. "The Indian Ocean Tsunami: Economic Impact, Disaster Management and Lessons," Departmental Working Papers 2005-05, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  8. David Card, 1989. "The Impact of the Mariel Boatlift on the Miami Labor Market," Working Papers 633, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  9. Olsson, Ola, 2010. "After Janjaweed? Socioeconomic Impacts of the Conflict in Darfur," Working Papers in Economics 429, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  10. David Card & Daniel Sullivan, 1987. "Measuring the Effect of Subsidized Training Programs on Movements In andOut of Employment," NBER Working Papers 2173, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Gruber, Jonathan, 1994. "The Incidence of Mandated Maternity Benefits," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 622-41, June.
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