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Immigration and native welfare

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Abstract

We unify two approaches towards identifying native welfare effects of immigration, one emphasizing the immigration surplus (Borjas, 1995,1999), the other identifying a welfare loss due to terms-of-trade effects (Davis & Weinstein, 2002). We decompose the native welfare effect of immigration into the standard complementarity effect, augmented by a Stolper-Samuelson effect, and a terms-of-trade effect. Using a structural model with three skill-classes we derive propositions on the wage and native welfare effects of various immigration scenarios. A calibration-based simulation reveals that the size of the inflow and immigrant income repatriation are key determinants of the welfare-ranking of different immigration scenarios.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriel J. Felbermayr & Wilhelm Kohler, 2004. "Immigration and native welfare," Economics working papers 2004-01, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  • Handle: RePEc:jku:econwp:2004_01
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    Cited by:

    1. Vallizadeh, Ehsan & Joan, Muysken & Thomas, Ziesemer, 2012. "The impact of medium-skilled immigration: a general equilibrium approach," MPRA Paper 40006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    3. Biavaschi, Costanza & Elsner, Benjamin, 2013. "Let's Be Selective about Migrant Self-Selection," IZA Discussion Papers 7865, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Michele Battisti & Gabriel Felbermayr & Giovanni Peri & Panu Poutvaara, 2014. "Immigration, Search, and Redistribution: A Quantitative Assessment of Native Welfare," CESifo Working Paper Series 5022, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Gabriel Felbermayr & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Can International Migration Ever Be Made a Pareto Improvement?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 11, pages 373-393 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    6. Harry P. Bowen & Jennifer Pedussel Wu, 2011. "Immigrant Specificity and the Relationship between Trade and Immigration: Theory and Evidence," Discussion Paper Series 2011-01, McColl School of Business, Queens University of Charlotte, revised 13 Jul 2012.
    7. Junko Doi & Laixun Zhao, 2012. "Immigration Conflicts," Discussion Paper Series DP2012-29, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Dec 2012.
    8. Costanza Biavaschi & Michal Burzynski & Benjamin Elsner & Joël Machado, 2016. "The Gain from the Drain - Skill-biased Migration and Global Welfare," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1624, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    9. Pierre M. Picard & Tim Worrall, 2016. "Is a Policy of Free Movement of Workers Sustainable?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, pages 718-754.
    10. Muysken, Joan & Vallizadeh, Ehsan & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2012. "Migration, Unemployment, and Over-qualification: A Specific-Factors Model Approach," MPRA Paper 43057, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Wido Geis, 2009. "Does Educational Choice Erode the Immigration Surplus?," ifo Working Paper Series 80, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    12. Bowen, Harry P. & Pédussel Wu, Jennifer, 2012. "Immigrant specificity and the relationship between trade and immigration: Theory and evidence," Working Papers 70, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute of Management Berlin (IMB).
    13. Karin Mayr, 2008. "Optimal quota for sector-specific immigration," Economics working papers 2008-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    14. Gabriel Felbermayr & Wido Geis & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Restrictive Immigration Policy in Germany: Pains and Gains Foregone?," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 12, pages 395-419 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    15. Udo Kreickemeier & Michael S. Michael, "undated". "Unemployment and the Immigration Surplus," Discussion Papers 08/31, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    16. Harry P. Bowen & Jennifer Pédussel Wu, 2013. "Immigrant Specificity and the Relationship between Trade and Immigration: Theory and Evidence," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 366-384, October.
    17. Karin Mayr, 2008. "Optimal quota for sector-specific immigration," Economics working papers 2008-07, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    18. repec:msb:wpaper:2013-01 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; factor movements; international trade; non-tradable goods; welfare analysis; wages; general equilibrium; terms-of-trade;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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