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Immigration Conflicts

Author

Listed:
  • Junko Doi

    (Faculty of Economics, Kansai University, Japan)

  • Laixun Zhao

    (Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration (RIEB), Kobe University, Japan)

Abstract

Almost all existing literature assumes immigrants immediately assimilate in the receiving country. In contrast, the present paper considers the case of non-immidiate assimilation, and analyzes immigration conflicts in an overlapping generations dynamic system. We examine three types of conflicts that arise when immigrants come in: skill conflicts that affect the capital rental and also cause the wage gap to change between skilled and unskilled workers; intergenerational conflicts that lead to different impacts on the young and old generations; and distributional conflicts that affect each generation's life time utility unequally. The degree of substitution between natives and immigrants in production plays a key role. We also analyze the welfare composition in detail generation by generation, and provide policy recommendation for each case.

Suggested Citation

  • Junko Doi & Laixun Zhao, 2012. "Immigration Conflicts," Discussion Paper Series DP2012-29, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Dec 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2012-29
    as

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    File URL: http://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2012-29.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. C. Simon Fan & Oded Stark, 2007. "A Social Proximity Explanation of the Reluctance to Assimilate," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 55-63, February.
    2. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Harrie Verbon & Lex Meijdam, 2008. "Too many migrants, too few services: a model of decision-making on immigration and integration with cultural distance," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(3), pages 665-677, July.
    4. Gabriel J Felbermayr & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Immigration and Native Welfare," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 10, pages 335-372 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    5. Galor, Oded & Stark, Oded, 1991. "The Impact of Differences in the Levels of Technology on International Labor Migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 4(1), pages 1-12, March.
    6. Edward P. Lazear, 2004. "Balanced Skills and Entrepreneurship," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 208-211, May.
    7. Michael Ben-Gad, 2008. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and the Immigration Surplus," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(2), pages 335-365, April.
    8. Edward P. Lazear, 1999. "Culture and Language," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 95-126, December.
    9. Scheve, Kenneth F. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2001. "What determines individual trade-policy preferences?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 267-292, August.
    10. Slobodan Djajić, 2003. "Assimilation of immigrants: Implications for human capital accumulation of the second generation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 831-845, November.
    11. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2002. "Inducing human capital formation: migration as a substitute for subsidies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 29-46, October.
    12. Timothy J. Hatton & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2005. "A Dual Policy Paradox: Why Have Trade and Immigration Policies Always Differed in Labor-Scarce Economies," NBER Working Papers 11866, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Overlapping generations; Inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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