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Assimilation of immigrants: Implications for human capital accumulation of the second generation

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  • Slobodan Djajić

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Abstract

Immigrants assimilate in various dimensions at different rates. Moreover, in each of these dimensions they assimilate at rates that may differ from those of their children. The purpose of this paper is to examine how the pace of assimilation of immigrants in various dimensions affects the rate of human capital accumulation of immigrant children. It is argued that rapid assimilation in certain dimensions serves to increase the rate of human capital accumulation of the second generation, while in other dimensions it may have the opposite effect. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Slobodan Djajić, 2003. "Assimilation of immigrants: Implications for human capital accumulation of the second generation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 831-845, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:16:y:2003:i:4:p:831-845
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-003-0162-1
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Juan A. Lacomba & Francisco Lagos, 2010. "Immigration and Pension Benefits in the Host Country," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(306), pages 283-295, April.
    2. Slobodan Djajić, 2008. "Immigrant Parents and Children: An Analysis of Decisions Related to Return Migration," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 469-485, August.
    3. Simone Schüller, 2015. "Parental ethnic identity and educational attainment of second-generation immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 965-1004, October.
    4. Zhang, Yi & Matz, Julia Anna, 2017. "On the train to brain gain in rural China," Discussion Papers 252443, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    5. Junko Doi & Laixun Zhao, 2012. "Immigration Conflicts," Discussion Paper Series DP2012-29, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Dec 2012.
    6. Aleksynska, Mariya, 2007. "Civic Participation of Immigrants: Culture Transmission and Assimilation," MPRA Paper 4594, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Matteo Barigozzi & Biagio Speciale, 2011. "Immigrants' legal status, permanence in the destination country and the distribution of consumption expenditure," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(14), pages 1341-1347.
    8. Lei Xu, 2007. "Characterization and Explanation of the 1996-2001 Inter-CMA Migration of the Second Generation in Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 196, McMaster University.
    9. Edgard Polanco, 2009. "Asimilación laboral de los inmigrantes colombianos en Estados Unidos," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, May.
    10. Zhao, Qiran & Yu, Xiaohua & Wang, Xiaobing & Glauben, Thomas, 2014. "The impact of parental migration on children's school performance in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 43-54.
    11. Pierre Kohler, 2012. "The Effect of Host Society Culture on Migrant Wage Discrimination: Approaching the Roestigraben," IHEID Working Papers 08-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    12. Delia Furtado, 2007. "Cross-Nativity Marriages, Gender, and Human Capital Levels of Children," Working papers 2007-33, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    13. Schaeffer, Peter V., 2006. "Outline of an Economic Theory of Assimilation," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 36(2).
    14. Pierre Kohler, 2012. "Economic Discrimination and Cultural Differences as Barriers to Migrant Integration: Is Reverse Causality Symmetric?," IHEID Working Papers 07-2012, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    F22; J61; J62; Assimilation; immigrants; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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