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Immigrant Parents and Children: An Analysis of Decisions Related to Return Migration

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  • Slobodan Djajić

Abstract

It is not unusual for immigrants to leave the host country and resettle permanently in their country of origin. This paper examines the interaction among some of the key factors that influence the return decision of immigrant households. These include purely economic variables such as wages of the two countries and the costs and benefits of accumulating country‐specific human capital, but also subjective factors such as the intensity of the locational preferences of immigrant parents and children and of their desire to remain together in a single location. The analysis is conducted under alternative assumptions with respect to the role of parents and children in the household's decision‐making process.

Suggested Citation

  • Slobodan Djajić, 2008. "Immigrant Parents and Children: An Analysis of Decisions Related to Return Migration," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 469-485, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:12:y:2008:i:3:p:469-485
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9361.2008.00441.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9361.2008.00441.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hill, John K., 1987. "Immigrant decisions concerning duration of stay and migratory frequency," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 221-234, February.
    2. Stark, Oded & Lucas, Robert E B, 1988. "Migration, Remittances, and the Family," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(3), pages 465-481, April.
    3. Slobodan Djajić, 2003. "Assimilation of immigrants: Implications for human capital accumulation of the second generation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 831-845, November.
    4. DaVanzo, Julie, 1983. "Repeat Migration in the United States: Who Moves Back and Who Moves On?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(4), pages 552-559, November.
    5. Per-Anders Edin & Robert J. LaLonde & Olof Aslund, 2000. "Emigration of Immigrants and Measures of Immigrant Assimilation: Evidence from Sweden," Working Papers 0020, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    6. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    7. Borjas, George J & Bratsberg, Bernt, 1996. "Who Leaves? The Outmigration of the Foreign-Born," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 165-176, February.
    8. Christian Dustmann, 2003. "Children and return migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 815-830, November.
    9. Robert Warren & Jennifer Peck, 1980. "Foreign-Born Emigration From The United States: 1960 To 1970," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 17(1), pages 71-84, February.
    10. Lucas, Robert E B & Stark, Oded, 1985. "Motivations to Remit: Evidence from Botswana," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(5), pages 901-918, October.
    11. Pessino, Carola, 1991. "Sequential migration theory and evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 55-87, July.
    12. repec:bla:blaboo:1557860300 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Brown, Richard P. C., 1997. "Estimating remittance functions for Pacific Island Migrants," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 613-626, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sylvie Démurger & Hui Xu, 2011. "Left-Behind Children and Return Decisions of Rural Migrants in China," Post-Print halshs-00625636, HAL.

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