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The impact of changes in the marital status on return migration of family migrants

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  • Govert Bijwaard

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  • Stijn Doeselaar

Abstract

Many migrants have non-labour motives to migrate, and they differ substantially from labour migrants in their migration behaviour. For family migrants, the decision to return is highly influenced by changes in their marital status. Using administrative panel data on the entire population of recent family immigrants to the Netherlands, we estimate the effect of a divorce and remarriage on the hazard of leaving the Netherlands using a ‘timing of events’ model. The model allows for correlated unobserved heterogeneity across the migration, the divorce and remarriage processes. The family migrants are divided into five groups based on the Human Development Index (HDI) of their country of birth. We find that both divorce and remarriage increase return of family migrants from less-developed countries. Remarriage of family migrants from developed countries makes them more prone to stay. Young migrants are influenced most by a divorce. The impact of the timing of a divorce and remarriage on return is quantified graphically. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Govert Bijwaard & Stijn Doeselaar, 2014. "The impact of changes in the marital status on return migration of family migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 961-997, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:27:y:2014:i:4:p:961-997
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-013-0495-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stuart Campbell, 2014. "Does it matter why immigrants came here? Original motives, the labour market, and national identity in the UK," DoQSS Working Papers 14-14, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
    2. Shan Li, 2016. "The determinants of Mexican migrants’ duration in the United States: family composition, psychic costs, and human capital," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-28, December.
    3. Jackline Wahba, 2014. "Return migration and economic development," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 12, pages 327-349 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Temporary migration; Timing-of-events method; Marital status dynamics; J12; F22; C41;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies

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