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Immigrant selection and short-term labor market outcomes by visa category

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  • Abdurrahman Aydemir

Abstract

This paper studies the efficacy of immigrant selection based on skill requirements in the Canadian context. The point system results in a much higher skill level than would otherwise be achieved by family preferences. This positive selection is achieved by directly selecting higher skilled principal applicants who are assessed by the point system and also indirectly through higher skilled spouses. However, due to difficulties in transfer of foreign human capital immigrants admitted for their skills do not necessarily perform better in the labour market and important factors used to assess admissibility have very limited power to predict short-term labour market success.
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  • Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2011. "Immigrant selection and short-term labor market outcomes by visa category," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 451-475, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:24:y:2011:i:2:p:451-475
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-009-0285-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Constant, Amelie & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2005. "Immigrant Performance and Selective Immigration Policy: A European Perspective," National Institute Economic Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 194, pages 94-105, October.
    2. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Marie Connolly & Christopher Worswick, 2005. "Post-migration investments in education and job search: a family perspective," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 663-690, November.
    3. George J. Borjas, 1993. "Immigration Policy, National Origin, and Immigrant Skills: A Comparison of Canada and the United States," NBER Chapters, in: Small Differences That Matter: Labor Markets and Income Maintenance in Canada and the United States, pages 21-44, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Card, David & Freeman, Richard B. (ed.), 1993. "Small Differences That Matter," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226092836, Febrero.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Point system; Visa category; J61; J68;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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