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Global labour markets, return, and onward migration

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  • Abdurrahman Aydemir
  • Chris Robinson

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that international migration is characterized by frequent return and onward migration. This has important consequences for the contribution of immigrants to the economy of the host country. Lack of longitudinal data has prevented much analysis of how frequently international migration involves a sequence of location decisions or how long the typical migrant stays in a host country. A newly available longitudinal data set covering all immigrants to Canada since 1980 provides the opportunity to address these issues. The results show that a large fraction of male immigrants who are of working age, especially among skilled workers and entrepreneurs, are highly internationally mobile.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdurrahman Aydemir & Chris Robinson, 2008. "Global labour markets, return, and onward migration," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1285-1311, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:41:y:2008:i:4:p:1285-1311
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5982.2008.00504.x
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy

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