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Moving and union dissolution

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Boyle

    ()

  • Hill Kulu
  • Thomas Cooke
  • Vernon Gayle
  • Clara Mulder

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Paul Boyle & Hill Kulu & Thomas Cooke & Vernon Gayle & Clara Mulder, 2008. "Moving and union dissolution," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(1), pages 209-222, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:45:y:2008:i:1:p:209-222 DOI: 10.1353/dem.2008.0000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Evelyn Lehrer & Carmel Chiswick, 1993. "Religion as a determinant of marital stability," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(3), pages 385-404, August.
    2. Lillard, Lee A., 1993. "Simultaneous equations for hazards : Marriage duration and fertility timing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 56(1-2), pages 189-217, March.
    3. Gunnar Andersson, 2003. "Dissolution of unions in Europe: a comparative overview," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-004, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    5. Paul J. Boyle & Hill Kulu & Thomas Cooke & Vernon Gayle & Clara H. Mulder, 2006. "The effect of moving on union dissolution," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-002, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Yen-hsin Alice Cheng, 2016. "More education, fewer divorces? Shifting education differentials of divorce in Taiwan from 1975 to 2010," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(33), pages 927-942, June.
    2. Thomas Cooke & Paul Boyle & Kenneth Couch & Peteke Feijten, 2009. "A longitudinal analysis of family migration and the gender gap in earnings in the united states and great britain," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(1), pages 147-167, February.
    3. David Clifford, 2009. "Spousal separation, selectivity and contextual effects: exploring the relationship between international labour migration and fertility in post-Soviet Tajikistan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 21(32), pages 945-975, December.
    4. Anja Vatterrott, 2011. "The fertility behaviour of East to West German migrants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. David M. Wright & Michael Rosato & Dermot O’Reilly, 2017. "Influence of Heterogamy by Religion on Risk of Marital Dissolution: A Cohort Study of 20,000 Couples," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 87-107, February.
    6. Anna Matysiak & Marta Styrc & Daniele Vignoli, 2011. "The changing educational gradient in marital disruption: A meta-analysis of European longitudinal research," Working Papers 45, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    7. Julie Moschion & Jan C. van Ours, 2017. "Do Childhood Experiences of Parental Separation Lead to Homelessness?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2017n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Govert Bijwaard & Stijn Doeselaar, 2014. "The impact of changes in the marital status on return migration of family migrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 961-997, October.
    9. Julie Moschion & Jan van Ours, 2017. "Do Childhood Experiences of Parental Separation Lead to Homelessness?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-035/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    10. Moschion, Julie & van Ours, Jan C., 2017. "Do Childhood Experiences of Parental Separation Lead to Homelessness?," CEPR Discussion Papers 11946, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:308-318 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Bijwaard, Govert & van Doeselaar, Stijn, 2012. "The Impact of Divorce on Return-Migration of Family Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 6852, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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