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Woman’s employment and union disruption in a changing socio-economic context: the case of Russia

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  • Magdalena M. Muszynska

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

Drawing on data from new Russian retrospective surveys, this study examines the relationship between women’s employment and the risk of union disruption within both the centrally planned economy and transition period. Our results show that within the two periods, the risk of union dissolution was similar among women who worked and women who did not work. In the transition period, however, differences in the dissolution risk among women existed and were related to the characteristics of the job conducted: occupational status, hours worked and income from side employment activities. Since the collapse of communism, the most discriminating factor between women is the type of ownership of a company, with those who worked for newly established private companies having elevated risk of union dissolution. The results obtained in this study are interpreted in light of the independence effect of women’s employment.

Suggested Citation

  • Magdalena M. Muszynska, 2006. "Woman’s employment and union disruption in a changing socio-economic context: the case of Russia," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2006-027
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2006-027.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Lokshin, 2004. "Household Childcare Choices and Women’s Work Behavior in Russia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(4).
    2. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-1187, December.
    3. Teresa Martin & Larry Bumpass, 1989. "Recent trends in marital disruption," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 26(1), pages 37-51, February.
    4. Paul J. Boyle & Hill Kulu & Thomas Cooke & Vernon Gayle & Clara H. Mulder, 2006. "The effect of moving on union dissolution," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-002, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Mroz, Thomas A & Popkin, Barry M, 1995. "Poverty and the Economic Transition in the Russian Federation," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(1), pages 1-31, October.
    6. Rose, Richard & McAllister, Ian, 1996. "Is Money the Measure of Welfare in Russia?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 42(1), pages 75-90, March.
    7. Sergei Scherbov & Harrie van Vianen, 2004. "Marriage in Russia: a reconstruction," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 10(2), pages 27-60, February.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Russian Federation; employment; women;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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