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Is Money the Measure of Welfare in Russia?

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  • Rose, Richard
  • McAllister, Ian

Abstract

The transformation of a non-market to a market economy ought to change fundamentally the significance of money incomes for welfare. Whereas in a stressful non-market economy such as the former Soviet Union, non-monetized resources could substitute for money income and promote welfare, in a modern market economy money income should be a good proxy for household welfare. This article tests the extent to which Russians are now in a modern market economy by analyzing data from nationwide Russian surveys in January, 1992, and April, 1994. Modern influences are increasingly important as a determinant of the distribution of money incomes, but not as an influence upon household welfare. The 'randomness' of temporary disruptions of welfare is in accord with Rawlsian principles of equity. Copyright 1996 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Rose, Richard & McAllister, Ian, 1996. "Is Money the Measure of Welfare in Russia?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 42(1), pages 75-90, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:42:y:1996:i:1:p:75-90
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Lokshin & Nithin Umapathi & Stefano Paternostro, 2006. "Robustness of subjective welfare analysis in a poor developing country: Madagascar 2001," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 559-591.
    2. Selezneva, Ekaterina, 2011. "Surveying transitional experience and subjective well-being: Income, work, family," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 139-157, June.
    3. Ivaschenko, Oleksiy, 2005. "The patterns and determinants of longevity in Russia's regions: Evidence from panel data," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 788-813, December.
    4. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 1999. "Who wants to redistribute? Russia's tunnel effect in the 1990's," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2150, The World Bank.
    5. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2000. "Who wants to redistribute?: The tunnel effect in 1990s Russia," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(1), pages 87-104, April.
    6. Kenneth Smith, 2003. "Individual Welfare in the Soviet Union," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 64(1), pages 75-105, October.
    7. Bird, Edward J. & Frick, Joachim R. & Wagner, Gert G., 1998. "The Income of Socialist Upper Classes during the Transition to Capitalism: Evidence from Longitudinal East German Data," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 211-225, June.
    8. Osberg, L. & Xu, K., 1998. "Poverty Intensity- How Well Does Canada Compare? ," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 98-05, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    9. Ferlander, Sara & Mäkinen, Ilkka Henrik, 2009. "Social capital, gender and self-rated health. Evidence from the Moscow Health Survey 2004," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 1323-1332, November.
    10. Christoph Bühler, 2003. "Additional work, family agriculture, and the birth of a first or a second child in Russia at the beginning of the 1990s," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-012, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Pietilä, Ilkka & Rytkönen, Marja, 2008. "Coping with stress and by stress: Russian men and women talking about transition, stress and health," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 327-338, January.
    12. Anita Staneva & G Arabsheibani, 2014. "Is there an informal employment wage premium? Evidence from Tajikistan," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-24, December.
    13. Carol Graham & Stefano Pettinato, 2001. "Happiness, Markets, and Democracy: Latin America in Comparative Perspective," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 237-268, September.
    14. Magdalena M. Muszynska, 2006. "Woman’s employment and union disruption in a changing socio-economic context: the case of Russia," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-027, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    15. Loretta G. Platts, 2015. "A prospective analysis of labour market status and self-rated health in the UK and Russia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 23(2), pages 343-370, April.
    16. Shireen Kanji, 2011. "Labor Force Participation, Regional Location, and Economic Well-Being of Single Mothers in Russia," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 62-72, March.
    17. Ravallion, Martin & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Identifying Welfare Effects from Subjective Questions," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(271), pages 335-357, August.
    18. Kim, Byung-Yeon, 2003. "Informal economy activities of Soviet households: size and dynamics," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 532-551, September.

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