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Robustness of subjective welfare analysis in a poor developing country: Madagascar 2001

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  • Michael Lokshin
  • Nithin Umapathi
  • Stefano Paternostro

Abstract

We analyse the subjective perceptions of poverty in Madagascar in 2001 and their relationship to objective poverty indicators. We base our analysis on survey responses to a series of subjective perception questions. We extend the existing empirical methodology for estimating subjective poverty lines on the basis of categorical consumption adequacy questions. Based on this methodology, we calculate the household-specific, subjective poverty lines. We are able to compare between the results of subjective poverty analysis using several types of subjective welfare questions. Our results show that the aggregate poverty measures derived from consumption adequacy questions accord quite well with the poverty measures based on objective poverty lines. We demonstrate that the subjective welfare analysis can be used in poor developing countries for evaluating socio-economic and distributional impacts of various policy interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Lokshin & Nithin Umapathi & Stefano Paternostro, 2006. "Robustness of subjective welfare analysis in a poor developing country: Madagascar 2001," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 559-591.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:42:y:2006:i:4:p:559-591
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380600680946
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    Cited by:

    1. Gero Carletto & Alberto Zezza, 2006. "Being poor, feeling poorer: Combining objective and subjective measures of welfare in Albania," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 739-760.
    2. repec:dau:papers:123456789/4394 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Reetz, Sunny W.H. & Schwarze, Stefan & Brümmer, Bernhard, 2012. "Poverty and Tropical Deforestation by Smallholders in Forest Margin Areas: Evidence from Central Sulawesi, Indonesia," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126326, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. Mussa, Richard, 2009. "Impact of fertility on objective and subjective poverty in Malawi," MPRA Paper 16089, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Shaffer, Paul, 2013. "Ten Years of “Q-Squared”: Implications for Understanding and Explaining Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 269-285.
    6. Javier Herrera & Mireille Razafindrakoto & François Roubaud, 2007. "Governance, Democracy and Poverty Reduction: Lessons Drawn from Household Surveys in Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America," International Statistical Review, International Statistical Institute, vol. 75(1), pages 70-95, April.
    7. Posel, Dorrit & Rogan, Michael, 2014. "Measured as poor versus feeling poor: Comparing objective and subjective poverty rates in South Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series 133, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Carolina Castilla, 2012. "Subjective well-being and reference-dependence: Insights from Mexico," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 10(2), pages 219-238, June.
    9. Ravallion, Martin, 2012. "Poor, or just feeling poor ? on using subjective data in measuring poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5968, The World Bank.
    10. Zsoka Koczan, 2016. "Being Poor, Feeling Poorer; Inequality, Poverty and Poverty Perceptions in the Western Balkans," IMF Working Papers 16/31, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Mauro Migotto & Benjamin Davis & Gero Carletto & Kathleen Beegle, 2005. "Measuring Food Security Using Respondents’ Perception of Food Consumption Adequacy," Working Papers 05-10, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
    12. Nazim, Habibov & Elvin, Afandi, 2009. "Analysis of subjective wellbeing in low-income transitional countries: evidence from comparative national surveys in Armenia,Azerbaijan and Georgia," MPRA Paper 42720, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. David Stifel & Marcel Fafchamps & Bart Minten, 2009. "Taboos, agriculture and poverty," CSAE Working Paper Series 2009-15, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    14. van Kempen, Luuk & Muradian, Roldan & Sandóval, César & Castañeda, Juan-Pablo, 2009. "Too poor to be green consumers? A field experiment on revealed preferences for firewood in rural Guatemala," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 2160-2167, May.
    15. Paul Ningaye & Hilaire Nkengfack & Marie Antoinette Simonet & Laurentine Yemata, 2007. "Diversité ethno-culturelle et différentiel de pauvreté multidimensionnelle au Cameroun," Working Papers PMMA 2007-03, PEP-PMMA.

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