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A longitudinal analysis of family migration and the gender gap in earnings in the united states and great britain

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  • Thomas Cooke

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  • Paul Boyle
  • Kenneth Couch
  • Peteke Feijten

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  • Thomas Cooke & Paul Boyle & Kenneth Couch & Peteke Feijten, 2009. "A longitudinal analysis of family migration and the gender gap in earnings in the united states and great britain," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(1), pages 147-167, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:46:y:2009:i:1:p:147-167
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.0.0036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christopher J. Ruhm, 1998. "The Economic Consequences of Parental Leave Mandates: Lessons from Europe," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(1), pages 285-317.
    2. Thomas J. Cooke & Karen Speirs, 2005. "Migration and Employment Among the Civilian Spouses of Military Personnel," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 86(2), pages 343-355.
    3. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    4. Joshi, Heather & Paci, Pierella & Waldfogel, Jane, 1999. "The Wages of Motherhood: Better or Worse?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(5), pages 543-564, September.
    5. Dora L. Costa & Matthew E. Kahn, 2008. "Learning from the Past," NBER Chapters,in: Heroes and Cowards: The Social Face of War National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Paul Boyle & Hill Kulu & Thomas Cooke & Vernon Gayle & Clara Mulder, 2008. "Moving and union dissolution," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 45(1), pages 209-222, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John V. Winters, 2017. "Do earnings by college major affect graduate migration?," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 59(3), pages 629-649, November.
    2. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:3:p:789-865 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. A. Jolly Nicholas, 2015. "Geographic Mobility and the Costs of Job Loss," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(4), pages 1793-1829, October.
    4. Kent Eliasson & Robert Nakosteen & Olle Westerlund & Michael Zimmer, 2014. "All in the family: Self-selection and migration by couples," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(1), pages 101-124, March.
    5. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2017. "The Gender Wage Gap: Extent, Trends, and Explanations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(3), pages 789-865, September.
    6. Francine D. Blau & Anne E. Winkler, 2017. "Women, Work, and Family," NBER Working Papers 23644, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Philipp M. Lersch, 2012. "Long-Distance Moves and Labour Market Outcomes of Dual-Earner Couples in the UK and Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 469, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    8. Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2010. "East-West migration and gender: Is there a differential effect for migrant women?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 443-454, April.
    9. Thomas J. Cooke, 2013. "All tied up: Tied staying and tied migration within the United States, 1997 to 2007," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(30), pages 817-836, October.
    10. Barth, Erling & Pekkala Kerr, Sari & Olivetti, Claudia, 2017. "The Dynamics of Gender Earnings Differentials: Evidence from Establishment Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10974, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2015. "Substitution between Individual and Source Country Characteristics: Social Capital, Culture, and US Labor Market Outcomes among Immigrant Women," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 439-482.
    12. Richard Wright & Steven Holloway & Mark Ellis, 2013. "Gender and the Neighborhood Location of Mixed-Race Couples," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(2), pages 393-420, April.
    13. Cristina Elena Bradatan, 2014. "The interplay between family and emigration from Romania," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 11(3), pages 368-376, September.

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