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Friendship ties and geographical mobility: evidence from Great Britain

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  • Michèle Belot
  • John Ermisch

Abstract

Summary. A common finding in analyses of geographic mobility is a strong association between past movement and current mobility. We argue that one of the driving forces behind this pattern is the strength of local social ties outside the household. We use data from the British Household Panel Survey on the location of the three closest friends and the frequency of meetings with them. We estimate the processes of friendship formation and residential mobility jointly, allowing for correlation between the two processes. Our results show that a larger number of close friends living nearby substantially reduces movement of 20 miles or more.

Suggested Citation

  • Michèle Belot & John Ermisch, 2009. "Friendship ties and geographical mobility: evidence from Great Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 172(2), pages 427-442, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:172:y:2009:i:2:p:427-442
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-985X.2008.00566.x
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-985X.2008.00566.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Breinlich, Holger & Ottaviano, Gianmarco I.P. & Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2014. "Regional Growth and Regional Decline," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 4, pages 683-779, Elsevier.
    2. Chien-Hao Fu, 2019. "Living arrangement and caregiving expectation: the effect of residential proximity on inter vivos transfer," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 247-275, January.
    3. John Ermisch & Elizabeth Washbrook, 2012. "Residential Mobility: Wealth, Demographic and Housing Market Effects," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 59(5), pages 483-499, November.
    4. Boenisch, Peter & Schneider, Lutz, 2013. "The social capital legacy of communism-results from the Berlin Wall experiment," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 391-411.
    5. Effrosyni Adamopoulou & Ezgi Kaya, 2018. "Young Adults Living with their Parents and the Influence of Peers," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 80(3), pages 689-713, June.
    6. Galenianos, Manolis, 2014. "Hiring through referrals," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 304-323.
    7. John Ermisch & Fiona Steele, 2016. "Fertility expectations and residential mobility in Britain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(54), pages 1561-1584.
    8. Ermisch, John & Gambetta, Diego, 2010. "Do strong family ties inhibit trust?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 365-376, September.
    9. Clara H. Mulder, 2018. "Putting family centre stage: Ties to nonresident family, internal migration, and immobility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 39(43), pages 1151-1180.
    10. Tak Chan & John Ermisch, 2015. "Proximity of Couples to Parents: Influences of Gender, Labor Market, and Family," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(2), pages 379-399, April.
    11. Eiji Yamamura & Yoshiro Tsutsui & Chisako Yamane & Shoko Yamane, 2014. "Effect of major disasters on geographical mobility intentions: the case of the Fukushima nuclear accident," ISER Discussion Paper 0903, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
    12. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Anil Rupasingha, 2018. "Individual Social Capital and Migration," Working Papers 18-14, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    13. Coulter, Rory & van Ham, Maarten & Findlay, Allan M., 2013. "New Directions for Residential Mobility Research: Linking Lives through Time and Space," IZA Discussion Papers 7525, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Peter Huber & Stepan Mikula, 2019. "Social capital and willingness to migrate in post-communist countries," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 31-59, February.
    15. repec:esx:essedp:729 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Enström Öst, Cecilia & Wilhelmsson, Mats, 2019. "The long-term consequences of youth housing for childbearing and higher education," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 41(5), pages 845-858.
    17. Eiji Yamamura, 2017. "Inherited social capital and residential mobility: A study using Japan panel data," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 579-558.

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