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The Determinants of First and Second Marital Dissolution. Evidence from Britain

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  • PARISI, Lavinia

    () (CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno - Italy)

Abstract

This paper investigates whether the determinants of first marriage dissolution differ from determinants of second marriage dissolution. Using data from British Household Panel Survey, I estimate a simultaneous hazard model for the risk of ending a first and a second marriage, taking into account unobserved heterogeneity. The model is estimated for men and women, separately. Cross-equations unobserved heterogeneity is not statistically different from zero. The most interesting findings is related to cohabitation before marriage: it is found to affect first and second marriage dissolution risk differently, namely it is found to increase the hazard of first marriage dissolution, but to reduce the hazard of second one.

Suggested Citation

  • PARISI, Lavinia, 2012. "The Determinants of First and Second Marital Dissolution. Evidence from Britain," CELPE Discussion Papers 121, CELPE - Centre of Labour Economics and Economic Policy, University of Salerno, Italy.
  • Handle: RePEc:sal:celpdp:0121
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ermisch, John, 2002. "Trying again: repartnering after dissolution of a union," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-19, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2007. "Marriage and Divorce: Changes and their Driving Forces," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 27-52, Spring.
    3. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-1187, December.
    4. Evelyn Lehrer, 2008. "Age at marriage and marital instability: revisiting the Becker–Landes–Michael hypothesis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(2), pages 463-484, April.
    5. Fiona Steele & Constantinos Kallis & Heather Joshi, 2006. "The formation and outcomes of cohabiting and marital partnerships in early adulthood: the role of previous partnership experience," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 169(4), pages 757-779, October.
    6. Spiros Bougheas & Yannis Georgellis, 1999. "The effect of divorce costs on marriage formation and dissolution," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 489-498.
    7. Evelyn Lehrer & Carmel Chiswick, 1993. "Religion as a determinant of marital stability," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 30(3), pages 385-404, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Cohabitation
      by UDADISI in UDADISI on 2012-08-27 16:18:00

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    marriage dissolutions; retrospective data; simultaneous hazard model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • D19 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Other
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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