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Sequential migration theory and evidence from Peru

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  • Pessino, Carola

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  • Pessino, Carola, 1991. "Sequential migration theory and evidence from Peru," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 55-87, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:36:y:1991:i:1:p:55-87
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    Cited by:

    1. Bertoli, Simone & Brücker, Herbert & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús, 2016. "The European crisis and migration to Germany," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 61-72.
    2. Joshua Hojvat Gallin, 2004. "Net Migration and State Labor Market Dynamics," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 1-22, January.
    3. Catalina Herrera & David Sahn, 2013. "Determinants of Internal Migration among Senegalese Youth," Working Papers halshs-00826995, HAL.
    4. Yamada, Gustavo, 2010. "Growth, Employment and Internal Migration. Peru, 2003-2007," MPRA Paper 22067, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Bellemare, Charles, 2007. "A life-cycle model of outmigration and economic assimilation of immigrants in Germany," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 553-576, April.
    6. Robert E. B. Lucas, 2000. "The Effects of Proximity and Transportation on Developing Country Population Migrations," Boston University - Department of Economics - The Institute for Economic Development Working Papers Series dp-111, Boston University - Department of Economics.
    7. Slobodan Djajić, 2008. "Immigrant Parents and Children: An Analysis of Decisions Related to Return Migration," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(3), pages 469-485, August.
    8. Farré, Lídia & Fasani, Francesco, 2013. "Media exposure and internal migration — Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 48-61.
    9. Brücker, Herbert & Bertoli, Simone & Fernández-Huertas Moraga, Jesús, 2013. "The European Crisis and Migration to Germany: Expectations and the Diversion of Migration Flows," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79693, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. James P. Smith & Duncan Thomas, 1998. "On the Road: Marriage and Mobility in Malaysia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 33(4), pages 805-832.
    11. Mohammad Arzaghi & Anil Rupasingha, 2013. "Migration As A Way To Diversify: Evidence From Rural To Urban Migration In The U.S," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 690-711, October.
    12. Bandiera, Oriana & Rasul, Imran & Viarengo, Martina, 2013. "The Making of Modern America: Migratory Flows in the Age of Mass Migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 23-47.
    13. Sabates, Ricardo, 2000. "Job Search and Migration in Peru," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 30(2).
    14. E. Lance Howe & Lee Huskey & Matthew D. Berman, 2011. "Migration in Arctic Alaska: Empirical Evidence of the Stepping Stones Hypothesis," Working Papers 2011-03, University of Alaska Anchorage, Department of Economics.
    15. Sonia Laszlo & Eric Santor, 2004. "Internal Migration and Borrowing Constraints: Evidence from Peru," Development and Comp Systems 0411022, EconWPA.
    16. Consuelo Abellán-Colodrón, 1998. "Ganancia salarial esperada como determinante de la decisión individual de emigrar," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 22(1), pages 93-117, January.
    17. Isaac C. Rischall, "undated". "The Effect of Migration on Earnings and Welfare Benefit Receipt," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 28, McMaster University.
    18. Salas Garcia, Vania Bitia & Findeis, Jill L., 2011. "The Next Generation: A New Approach to Explain Migration," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103495, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    19. John Kennan & James R. Walker, 2013. "Modeling individual migration decisions," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 2, pages 39-54 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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