IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this paper

Immigration and Pension Benefits in the Host-country

This paper examines the role that low-skilled immigrant labor force plays in determining the benefits of the public pension of the host population. With an overlapping-generations model in continuous time which allows to identify which groups of native population are better or worse off with immigration and a fully redistributive pension system, we find that the retirement benefits and hence the welfare levels of the host population are affected in a different way whether sharing or not pension benefits with immigrants. In this sense, the youngest local population may prefer, contrary to the oldest ones, a policy of closed borders.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Centro de Estudios Andaluces in its series Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces with number E2004/77.

in new window

Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2004_77
Contact details of provider: Postal:
c/ Bailén 50. 41001 Sevilla

Phone: (34) 955 055 210
Fax: (34) 955 055 211
Web page:

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Georges Casamatta & Helmuth Cremer & Pierre Pestieau, 2000. "The Political Economy of Social Security," CESifo Working Paper Series 259, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Lindbeck, Assar & Persson, Mats, 2002. "The Gains from Pension Reform," Seminar Papers 712, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  3. Leers, Theo & Meijdam, Lex & Verbon, Harrie A. A., 2004. "Ageing, migration and endogenous public pensions," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1-2), pages 131-159, January.
  4. Razin, A. & Sadka, E., 1999. "Unskilled Migration: a Burden or a Boon for the Welfare State?," Papers 8-99, Tel Aviv.
  5. Juan Antonio Lacomba & Francisco Miguel Lagos, 2005. "Population Aging and Legal Retirement Age," ThE Papers 05/16, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
  6. Sinn, Hans-Werner, 2002. "EU enlargement and the future of the welfare state," Munich Reprints in Economics 19736, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Cremer, Helmuth & Pestieau, Pierre, 1998. "Social insurance, majority voting and labor mobility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 397-420, June.
  8. Tim Krieger, 2006. "Public pensions and return migration," Working Papers CIE 2, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
  9. Slobodan Djajić, 2003. "Assimilation of immigrants: Implications for human capital accumulation of the second generation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 831-845, November.
  10. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1999. "Migration and pension with international capital mobility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 141-150, October.
  11. Lagos Francisco & Lacomba Juan, 2005. "The Role of Immigration in the Retirement Age Reform : A Theoretical Analysis," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-20, September.
  12. Tim Krieger, 2004. "Fertility rates and skill distribution in Razin and Sadka’s migration-pension model: A note," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 177-182, February.
  13. Sheetal K. Chand & Martin Paldam, 2004. "The economics of immigration into a Nordic welfare state - and a comparison to an immigration state and a guest worker state," Economics Working Papers 2004-4, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
  14. Krieger, Tim, 2004. "Public pensions and immigration policy when voters are differently skilled," Arbeitspapiere der Nordakademie 2004-01, Nordakademie - Hochschule der Wirtschaft.
  15. Haupt, Alexander & Peters, Wolfgang, 1998. "Public Pensions and Voting on Immigration," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 95(3-4), pages 403-13, June.
  16. Scholten, Ulrich & Thum, Marcel, 1996. "Public Pensions and Immigration Policy in a Democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 87(3-4), pages 347-61, June.
  17. Krieger, Tim, 2003. "Voting on Low-Skill Immigration under Different Pension Regimes," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(1-2), pages 51-78, October.
  18. Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka, 1995. "Population Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262181606, December.
  19. Peter Diamond, 2004. "Social Security," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 1-24, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cea:doctra:e2004_77. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Susana Mérida)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.