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The impact of immigration under the defined-benefit pension system


  • Masatoshi Jinno

    (Toyo University, Tokyo)


This paper investigates whether or not the admission of unskilled immigrants, whose children incur assimilation costs in order to become skilled workers, has a positive impact on the net benefits for native residents and immigrants under a defined-benefit pension system (DB system). The results under the DB system are compared with those under the DC system, showing that the number of immigrants under the DB system to render the net benefits for the native residents positive is higher than that under the DC system.

Suggested Citation

  • Masatoshi Jinno, 2013. "The impact of immigration under the defined-benefit pension system," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(21), pages 613-636, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:28:y:2013:i:21

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Aslan Zorlu & Joop Hartog, 2005. "The effect of immigration on wages in three european countries," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(1), pages 113-151, December.
    2. Poul Schou, 2006. "Immigration, integration and fiscal sustainability," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 671-689, October.
    3. Tim Krieger, 2004. "Fertility rates and skill distribution in Razin and Sadka’s migration-pension model: A note," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 177-182, February.
    4. Alexander Kemnitz, 2003. "Immigration, Unemployment and Pensions," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(1), pages 31-48, March.
    5. Scholten, Ulrich & Thum, Marcel, 1996. "Public Pensions and Immigration Policy in a Democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 87(3-4), pages 347-361, June.
    6. Ortega, Francesc, 2005. "Immigration quotas and skill upgrading," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(9-10), pages 1841-1863, September.
    7. Rachel M. Friedberg & Jennifer Hunt, 1995. "The Impact of Immigrants on Host Country Wages, Employment and Growth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 23-44, Spring.
    8. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1999. "Migration and pension with international capital mobility," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 141-150, October.
    9. Krieger, Tim, 2003. "Voting on Low-Skill Immigration under Different Pension Regimes," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 117(1-2), pages 51-78, October.
    10. Andreas Wagener, 2003. "Pensions as a portfolio problem: fixed contribution rates vs. fixed replacement rates reconsidered," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(1), pages 111-134, February.
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    More about this item


    immigration; net benefits; pension systems; social security;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General


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