IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/jopoec/v19y2006i4p671-689.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Immigration, integration and fiscal sustainability

Author

Listed:
  • Poul Schou

    ()

Abstract

Economic theory points out that immigration of even low-skilled immigrants may improve public finances in Western welfare states, and it is some times suggested that fiscal sustainability problems in Western countries caused by ageing populations could be solved by increasing immigration. We examine consequences of various immigration scenarios using the large-scale computable general equilibrium model DREAM describing the Danish economy. It turns out that increased immigration will generally worsen the Danish fiscal sustainability. Improved economic integration of immigrants and their descendants, however, may alleviate the problems of the public sector considerably.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Poul Schou, 2006. "Immigration, integration and fiscal sustainability," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 671-689, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:19:y:2006:i:4:p:671-689
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-005-0027-x
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00148-005-0027-x
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hans Roodenburg & Rob Euwals & Harry ter Rele, 2003. "Immigration and the Dutch economy," CPB Special Publication 47, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    2. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    3. Alexander Kemnitz, 2003. "Immigration, Unemployment and Pensions," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(1), pages 31-48, March.
    4. David Coleman & Robert Rowthorn, 2004. "The Economic Effects of Immigration into the United Kingdom," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 30(4), pages 579-624.
    5. Holger Bonin & Bernd Raffelhüschen & Jan Walliser, 2000. "Can Immigration Alleviate the Demographic Burden?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 57(1), pages 1-1, September.
    6. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Tim Krieger, 2014. "Public Pensions and Immigration," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(2), pages 10-15, 07.
    2. Masatoshi Jinno, 2013. "The impact of immigration under the defined-benefit pension system," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(21), pages 613-636, March.
    3. Murat G. Kirdar, 2012. "Estimating The Impact Of Immigrants On The Host Country Social Security System When Return Migration Is An Endogenous Choice," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 53(2), pages 453-486, May.
    4. Leonid V. Azarnert, 2018. "Refugee Resettlement, Redistribution and Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 6961, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. repec:spr:jopoec:v:30:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0636-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Johannes Berger & Thomas Davoine & Philip Schuster & Ludwig Strohner, 2016. "Cross-country differences in the contribution of future migration to old-age financing," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(6), pages 1160-1184, December.
    7. Marianne Frank Hansen & Marie Louise Schultz-Nielsen & Torben Tranæs, 2015. "The Impact of Immigrants on Public Finances: A Forecast Analysis for Denmark," DREAM Working Paper Series 201501, Danish Rational Economic Agents Model, DREAM.
    8. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Eva Cárceles-Poveda & Selçuk Eren, 2011. "Effects of Legal and Unauthorized Immigration on the U.S. Social Security System," Working Papers wp250, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    9. Javier Vazquez Grenno, 2010. "Spanish pension system: Population aging and immigration policy," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 195(4), pages 37-64, december.
    10. Barslund, Mikkel & von Werder, Marten, 2016. "Measuring Dependency Ratios using National Transfer Accounts," CEPS Papers 11491, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    11. Marianne Frank Hansen & Marie Louise Schultz-Nielsen & Torben Tranæs, 2017. "The fiscal impact of immigration to welfare states of the Scandinavian type," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 30(3), pages 925-952, July.
    12. Krieger, Tim, 2005. "Renten und Zuwanderung: Ein Überblick über neue Ergebnisse der Forschung," Arbeitspapiere der Nordakademie 2005-04, Nordakademie - Hochschule der Wirtschaft.
    13. Ian Preston, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Public Finances," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 569-592, November.
    14. James P. Smith, 2014. "Taxpayer effects of immigration," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-50, May.
    15. Gurgen Aslanyan, 2014. "The migration challenge for PAYG," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 1023-1038, October.
    16. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:3:p:909-934 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:2:p:19116205 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Sustainable fiscal policy; CGE models; F22; E62; D58;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:19:y:2006:i:4:p:671-689. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.