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Fertility Rates and Skill Distribution in Razin and Sadka's Migration-Pension Model: A Note


  • Krieger, Tim


Razin and Sadka (1999) show that unskilled immigration is beneficial to all income and all age groups in society, even if immigrants are net beneficiaries of the welfare system. Among other things, this result rests on the assumptions that immigrants have the same reproduction rate as the native population and that the immigrants' offspring has the same distribution of skills as the natives' offspring. By relaxing these assumptions, we show that the Razin and Sadka result is no longer unambiguous.

Suggested Citation

  • Krieger, Tim, 2003. "Fertility Rates and Skill Distribution in Razin and Sadka's Migration-Pension Model: A Note," Discussion Papers in Economics 82, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:muenec:82

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tim Krieger, 2014. "Public Pensions and Immigration," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(2), pages 10-15, 07.
    2. Tim Krieger & Thomas Lange, 2012. "Education, Life Expectancy and Pension Reform," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 202(3), pages 31-55, September.
    3. Masatoshi Jinno, 2013. "The impact of immigration under the defined-benefit pension system," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(21), pages 613-636, March.
    4. Tim Krieger & Jens Ruhose, 2013. "Honey, I shrunk the kids’ benefits—revisiting intergenerational conflict in OECD countries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 157(1), pages 115-143, October.
    5. Kemnitz, Alexander, 2008. "Can immigrant employment alleviate the demographic burden? The role of union centralization," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 123-126, April.
    6. Tim Krieger, 2008. "Public pensions and return migration," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 134(3), pages 163-178, March.
    7. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
    8. Muysken Joan & Cörvers Frank & Ziesemer Thomas, 2008. "Immigration can alleviate the ageing problem," Research Memorandum 004, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    9. Muysken, Joan & Ziesemer, Thomas, 2011. "Immigration and growth in an ageing economy - version 2," MERIT Working Papers 037, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    10. Javier Vázquez Grenno, 2008. "Immigration in a Segmented Labor Market: The Effects on Welfare," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(2), pages 199-217, June.
    11. Gurgen Aslanyan, 2012. "Migration Challenge for PAYG," FIW Working Paper series 101, FIW.
    12. Krieger, Tim, 2004. "Public pensions and immigration policy when voters are differently skilled," Arbeitspapiere der Nordakademie 2004-01, Nordakademie - Hochschule der Wirtschaft.
    13. Krieger, Tim, 2005. "Renten und Zuwanderung: Ein Überblick über neue Ergebnisse der Forschung," Arbeitspapiere der Nordakademie 2005-04, Nordakademie - Hochschule der Wirtschaft.
    14. repec:eee:hapoch:v1_119 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Ian Preston, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Public Finances," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 124(580), pages 569-592, November.
    16. Juan A. Lacomba & Francisco Lagos, 2010. "Immigration and Pension Benefits in the Host Country," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(306), pages 283-295, April.
    17. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    18. Gurgen Aslanyan, 2012. "Immigration Control & Long-Run Population Welfare," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp453, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    19. Gurgen Aslanyan, 2014. "The migration challenge for PAYG," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 27(4), pages 1023-1038, October.
    20. repec:ces:ifodic:v:12:y:2014:i:2:p:19116205 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Zaiceva, A. & Zimmermann, K.F., 2016. "Migration and the Demographic Shift," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, Elsevier.
    22. Igor Fedotenkov & Lex Meijdam, 2014. "Pension reform with migration and mobile capital: is a Pareto improvement possible?," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 431-450, September.

    More about this item


    fertility rates ; immigration policy ; public pensions;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers


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