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Migration and Welfare State: Why is America Different from Europe?

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  • Razin, Assaf
  • Sadka, Efraim

Abstract

Over the years, there emerged two key policy differences between Europe and America, both welfare and migration-states. The former has more generous welfare state and more liberal migration policies than the latter. In this paper we attempt to provide a political-economy explanation for these key differences, based on the degree of coordination among member states of the economic union, and the different levels of population aging.

Suggested Citation

  • Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 2014. "Migration and Welfare State: Why is America Different from Europe?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10127, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10127
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tito Boeri, 2010. "Immigration to the Land of Redistribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(308), pages 651-687, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lumpe, Christian & Lumpe, Claudia & Meckl, Jürgen, 2016. "Social status and public expectations: Self-selection of high-skilled migrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 614, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal and Migration Competition; Fiscal and Migration Coordination;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

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