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Social Status and Public Expectations: Self-Selection of High-Skilled Migrants

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  • Lumpe, Claudia
  • Lumpe, Christian

Abstract

We analyze public expectations about migrants' provision of work effort as a driving force in the self-selection process of high-skilled migrants. We adopt and extend Piketty's (1998) theoretical framework of social status and work out how country-specific public expectations affect the migrants' choice about their country of destination. As a result, we relate Germany's attested low attractiveness for high-skilled immigrants to its society's attitudes towards immigrants. We develop measures to increase Germany's attractiveness in the competition about talents.

Suggested Citation

  • Lumpe, Claudia & Lumpe, Christian, 2016. "Social Status and Public Expectations: Self-Selection of High-Skilled Migrants," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145685, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc16:145685
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 2014. "Migration and Welfare State: Why is America Different from Europe?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10127, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Arne Uhlendorff & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2014. "Unemployment Dynamics among Migrants and Natives," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 81(322), pages 348-367, April.
    3. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    4. Yann Algan & Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Allan Manning, 2010. "The Economic Situation of First ans Second-Generation in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/536kq4edtr8, Sciences Po.
    5. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    6. Yann Algan & Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz & Alan Manning, 2010. "The Economic Situation of First and Second-Generation Immigrants in France, Germany and the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(542), pages 4-30, February.
    7. Leo Kaas & Christian Manger, 2012. "Ethnic Discrimination in Germany's Labour Market: A Field Experiment," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 13(1), pages 1-20, February.
    8. Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Who Is Against Immigration? A Cross-Country Investigation of Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 510-530, August.
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    11. Giovanni Peri, 2005. "Skills and Talent of Immigrants:A Comparison between the European Union and the United States," Working Papers 524, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
    12. Piketty, Thomas, 1998. "Self-fulfilling beliefs about social status," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 115-132, October.
    13. Borjas, George J, 1987. "Self-Selection and the Earnings of Immigrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 531-553, September.
    14. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
    15. Wido Geis & Silke Übelmesser & Martin Werding, 2008. "Why go to France or Germany, if you could as well go to the UK or the US? Selective Features of Immigration to four major OECD Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 2427, CESifo Group Munich.
    16. Wido Geis & Silke Uebelmesser & Martin Werding, 2011. "Why Go to France or Germany, if You Could as Well Go to the UK or the US? Selective Features of Immigration to the EU ‘Big Three’ and the United States," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 767-796, July.
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    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor

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