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Social Security Reform

Editor

Listed:
  • Brooks,Robin
  • Razin,Assaf

Abstract

As population aging has become increasingly acute in many countries, the debate over how to reform often creaking public pension systems has gathered momentum. In many cases, this debate has become politicized and the focus on some of the underlying economic issues has been lost. This volume hopes to redress some of this imbalance. It begins by examining the rationale behind why public pension systems were introduced originally - out of fear that individuals do not adequately save for retirement. It then systematically examines different aspects of reforming these systems. It covers the fiscal repercussions of reform, the implications of the baby boom on asset returns in the years ahead, the political economy of the reform process, and finally the risk-sharing implications that are inherent in reform. An important additional goal of this volume is to make it accessible to as wide an audience as possible: students, academics, and policy makers.

Suggested Citation

  • Brooks,Robin & Razin,Assaf (ed.), 2005. "Social Security Reform," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521844956, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521844956
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew A. Samwick, 2009. "Changing Progressivity as a Means of Risk Protection in Investment-Based Social Security," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Policy in a Changing Environment, pages 299-327 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 2007. "Aging population: The complex effect of fiscal leakages on the politico-economic equilibrium," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 564-575, June.
    3. Tamim Bayoumi & Dennis P Botman & Manmohan S. Kumar, 2005. "Macroeconomic Effects of Social Security and Tax Reform in the United States," IMF Working Papers 05/208, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Martín Gonzalez-Eiras & Dirk Niepelt, 2012. "Economic and Politico-Economic Equivalence," Working Papers 12.02, Swiss National Bank, Study Center Gerzensee.
    5. Dennis Botman & Philippe Karam & Douglas Laxton, 2008. "Les modèles DSGE au FMI : applications et développements récents," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(2), pages 175-198.
    6. Dirk Niepelt & Martin Gonzalez-Eiras, 2008. "Economic and Politico-Economic Equivalence of Fiscal Policies," 2008 Meeting Papers 631, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Desmet, Raphaël & Jousten, Alain & Perelman, Sergio, 2005. "The Benefits of Separating Early Retirees from the Unemployed: Simulation Results for Belgian Wage Earners," IZA Discussion Papers 1571, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Botman, Dennis & Edison, Hali & N'Diaye, Papa, 2009. "Strategies for fiscal consolidation in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 151-160, March.
    9. Martin Feldstein, 2005. "Structural Reform of Social Security," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(2), pages 33-55, Spring.
    10. Manmohan S. Kumar & Dennis P Botman, 2006. "Fundamental Determinants of the Effects of Fiscal Policy," IMF Working Papers 06/72, International Monetary Fund.
    11. Attanasio Orazio P. & Kitao Sagiri & Violante Giovanni L., 2006. "Quantifying the Effects of the Demographic Transition in Developing Economies," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-44, April.

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