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International Migration and International Trade

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  • Assaf Razin
  • Efraim Sadka

Abstract

This paper surveys key developments in the theory of international migration and international trade, and provides a few stylized facts. International migration, in many important cases, such as cross-country differences in productivity, can be a complement to international flows of commodities. In the presence of a productivity difference that is generated by an external economy effect of human, capital physical capital has weak incentives to flow from developed to underdeveloped countries while pressures for international migration from poor to rich countries are strong. The balancing factors underlying an efficient global dispersion of population are those which generate advantages to size, such as public goods, or increasing returns to scale on one hand, and those which generate disadvantages to size, such as immobile factors or congestion effects in the utilization of public services, on the other hand. The modem welfare state typically redistribute income from the rich to the poor in a way which attracts poor migrants from the less developed countries. Since migration could impose a toll on the redistribution policy of the Developed Country it may benefit from the extension of foreign aid to the Less Developed Country if this aid serves to finance a subsidy to workers in the Less Developed Country, thereby containing migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka, 1992. "International Migration and International Trade," NBER Working Papers 4230, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:4230 Note: ITI LS
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Osang, 2006. "External and internal determinants of development," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 35-59.
    2. Alex Cukierman & Zvi Hercowitz & David Pines, 1994. "The Political Economy of Immigration," Public Economics 9405002, EconWPA.
    3. Jean-Marie Grether & Jaime de Melo & Tobias Müller, 2015. "The Political Economy of International Migration in a Ricardo–Viner Model," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Developing Countries in the World Economy, chapter 17, pages 411-437 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    4. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Friedman, Daniel, 2009. "Speculative attacks: A laboratory study in continuous time," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1064-1082, October.
    5. Gabriel J Felbermayr & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Immigration and Native Welfare," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 10, pages 335-372 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    6. Maurice Obstfeld, 1993. "International Capital Mobility in the 1990s," NBER Working Papers 4534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Ben J Heijdra & Christian Keuschnigg & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Eastern Enlargement of the EU: Jobs, Investment and Welfare in Present Member Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 2, pages 37-83 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Adama Konseiga, 2007. "Household Migration Decisions as Survival Strategy: The Case of Burkina Faso," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(2), pages 198-233, March.
    9. G. Ottaviano, 1995. "A Geographic Approach to International Economics: 'Strategic Trade Policy'?," Working Papers 216, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    10. Alessandra Venturini & Riccardo Faini, 2008. "Development and Migration: Lessons from Southern Europe," CHILD Working Papers wp10_08, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
    11. Wellisch, Dietmar & Walz, Uwe, 1998. "Why do rich countries prefer free trade over free migration? The role of the modern welfare state," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1595-1612, September.
    12. Fedotenkov, Igor & van Groezen, Bas & Meijdam, Lex, 2012. "International trade with pensions and demographic shocks," MPRA Paper 74874, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 31 May 2016.
    13. Razin, Assaf & Yuen, Chi-Wa, 1997. "Factor Mobility and Income Growth: Two Convergence Hypotheses," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(2), pages 171-190, June.
    14. Sule Akkoyunlu & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2007. "The Role of Remittances in Migration Decision: Evidence from Turkish Migration," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 691, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    15. David E. Bloom & Waseen Noor, 1995. "Is an Integrated Regional Labor Market Emergin in East and Southeast Asia?," NBER Working Papers 5174, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    16. Stephen Drinkwater & Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman, 2003. "The Economic Impact of Migration: A Survey," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0103, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    17. Ben J. Heijdra & Christian Keuschnigg, 2000. "Integration and Search Unemployment: An Analysis of Eastern EU Enlargement," CESifo Working Paper Series 341, CESifo Group Munich.
    18. Daniel Trefler, 1997. "Immigrants and Natives in General Equilibrium Trade Models," NBER Working Papers 6209, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    19. Sule Akkoyunlu & Boriss Siliverstovs, 2006. "Modelling Turkish Migration to Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 595, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    20. Huizinga, H.P., 1994. "Migration and income transfers in the presence of labor quality externalities," Discussion Paper 1994-104, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.

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    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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