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Forced Migration and the Effects of an Integration Policy in Post-WWII Germany

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  • Falck Oliver
  • Heblich Stephan
  • Link Susanne

Abstract

After World War II, about 8 million ethnic Germans — so called expellees — were forced to leave their homelands and settle within the new borders of West Germany. Subsequently, a law (Federal Expellee Law) was introduced to foster their labor market integration. We evaluate this law by comparing the employment situation between expellees and groups of West Germans and GDR refugees over time. We define our comparison groups to uncover even small effects of the law. Still, we find no evidence that the law met its goal to foster the expellees’ labor market integration.

Suggested Citation

  • Falck Oliver & Heblich Stephan & Link Susanne, 2012. "Forced Migration and the Effects of an Integration Policy in Post-WWII Germany," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-29, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejeap:v:12:y:2012:i:1:n:18
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William R. Kerr, 2011. "Economic Impacts of Immigration: A Survey," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 24(1), pages 1-32, Spring.
    2. Thomas K. Bauer & Sebastian Braun & Michael Kvasnicka, 2013. "The Economic Integration of Forced Migrants: Evidence for Post‐War Germany," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123, pages 998-1024, September.
    3. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
    4. Jäntti, Markus & Sarvimäki, Matti & Uusitalo, Roope, 2009. "Long-term effects of forced migration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 33616, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Marc Schramm, 2004. "The strategic bombing of German cities during World War II and its impact on city growth," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(2), pages 201-218, April.
    6. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
    7. repec:zbw:rwirep:0267 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Schmidt, Christoph M, 1994. "The Economic Performance of Germany's East European Immigrants," CEPR Discussion Papers 963, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. George J. Borjas, 1994. "The Economics of Immigration," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(4), pages 1667-1717, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bauer, Thomas K. & Giesecke, Matthias & Janisch, Laura M., 2017. "Forced migration and mortality," Ruhr Economic Papers 713, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Braun, Sebastian & Dwenger, Nadja, 2017. "The local environment shapes refugee integration: Evidence from post-war Germany," Hohenheim Discussion Papers in Business, Economics and Social Sciences 10-2017, University of Hohenheim, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences.
    3. Semrad, Alexandra, 2015. "Immigration and educational spillovers: evidence from Sudeten German expellees in post-war Bavaria," Discussion Papers in Economics 24851, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    4. Braun, Sebastian & Kvasnicka, Michael, 2014. "Immigration and structural change: Evidence from post-war Germany," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 253-269.
    5. Braun, Sebastian & Weber, Henning, 2016. "How do regional labor markets adjust to immigration? A dynamic analysis for post-war Germany," Kiel Working Papers 2025, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Bauernschuster, Stefan & Falck, Oliver & Gold, Robert & Heblich, Stephan, 2012. "The shadows of the socialist past: Lack of self-reliance hinders entrepreneurship," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 485-497.

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