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Migration in Libya : A Spatial Network Analysis

Author

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  • Di Maio,Michele
  • Leone Sciabolazza,Valerio
  • Molini,Vasco

Abstract

This paper provides the first systematic analysis of migration to, within, and from Libya. The data used in the analysis are from the Displacement Tracking Matrix data set of the International Organization for Migration. The analysis uses this unique source of data, combining several techniques to analyze various dimensions of migration in Libya. First, the paper provides a detailed description of the demographic characteristics and national composition of the migrant populations in Libya. Next, it discusses the determinants of migration flow within Libya. The findings show that migration in Libya can be characterized as forced migration, because conflict intensity is the main determinant of the decision to relocate across provinces. Finally, the paper describes the direction, composition, and evolution of international migration flows passing through Libya and identifies the mechanisms of location selection by migrants within Libya by identifying hotspots and cluster provinces.

Suggested Citation

  • Di Maio,Michele & Leone Sciabolazza,Valerio & Molini,Vasco, 2020. "Migration in Libya : A Spatial Network Analysis," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9110, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:9110
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Cohesion; Social Conflict and Violence; Armed Conflict; International Migration; Human Migrations&Resettlements; Migration and Development; Labor Markets;
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