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South-North Refugee Migration: Lessons for Development Cooperation

Author

Listed:
  • Rotte, Ralph
  • Vogler, Michael
  • Zimmermann, Klaus F

Abstract

As exemplified in the 1995 Mediterranean Declaration of the European Union, migration has become a major concern for European development policies. By enhancing socio-economic conditions through development cooperation, a reduction of South-North migration flows is envisaged. This new approach is examined by analysing the causes of asylum migration from developing countries to Germany. The econometric findings suggest that support of democracy, economic development and trade will not reduce migration, at least in the medium run, although restrictive legal measures do work. Migration control by international development cooperation therefore seems to need a long-term perspective.

Suggested Citation

  • Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1997. "South-North Refugee Migration: Lessons for Development Cooperation," CEPR Discussion Papers 1578, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1578
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael A. Clemens & Hannah M. Postel, 2018. "Deterring Emigration with Foreign Aid: An Overview of Evidence from Low‐Income Countries," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 44(4), pages 667-693, December.
    2. Hatton, Timothy J. & Moloney, Joe, 2015. "Applications for Asylum in the Developed World: Modelling Asylum Claims by Origin and Destination," CEPR Discussion Papers 10678, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Timothy J. Hatton & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2004. "Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Policy in Europe," NBER Working Papers 10680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. repec:eee:eecrev:v:112:y:2019:i:c:p:127-147 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Graziella Bertocchi & Arcangelo Dimico & Francesco Lancia & Alessia Russo, 2017. "Youth Enfranchisement, Political Responsiveness, and Education Expenditure: Evidence from the U.S," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 130, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Thomas Ziesemer, 2011. "Growth with endogenous migration hump and the multiple, dynamically interacting effects of aid in poor developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(30), pages 4865-4878.
    7. Marina Murat, 2017. "Foreign aid and asylum immigration. Does development matter?," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 133, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    8. Dreher, Axel & Fuchs, Andreas & Langlotz, Sarah, 2019. "The effects of foreign aid on refugee flows," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 127-147.
    9. Hatton, Timothy J., 2012. "Refugee and Asylum Migration to the OECD: A Short Overview," IZA Discussion Papers 7004, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Barthel, Fabian & Neumayer, Eric, 2015. "Spatial dependence in asylum migration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64187, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    11. Hendrik Dalen & George Groenewold & Jeannette Schoorl, 2005. "Out of Africa: what drives the pressure to emigrate?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 741-778, November.
    12. Rotte, Ralph, 1998. "Sorties from the Fortress: The Current System of Anti-Immigration Policy in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 13, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    13. Bergh, Andreas & Mirkina, Irina & Nilsson, Therese, 2015. "Pushed by Poverty or by Institutions? Determinants of Global Migration Flows," Working Paper Series 1077, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    14. Czaika, Mathias & Mayer, Amy, 2007. "Burden-sharing or migration management?," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Göttingen 2007 3, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    15. Timothy J. Hatton, 2005. "European Asylum Policy," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 194(1), pages 106-119, October.
    16. Marina Murat, 2017. "Foreign Aid and responsiveness of bilateral refugee inflows," Department of Economics 0113, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    17. Timothy J. Hatton, 2013. "Refugee and asylum migration," Chapters, in: Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 24, pages 453-469, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    18. Marina Murat, 2017. "Foreign aid and asylum immigration. Does development matter?," Department of Economics 0120, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    19. Murat, Marina, 2019. "Foreign aid, bilateral asylum immigration and development," GLO Discussion Paper Series 378, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Development Economics; Migration; Refugees; South-North Relations;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • O20 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - General

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