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Refugee and Asylum Migration to the OECD: A Short Overview

  • Hatton, Timothy J.

    ()

    (University of Essex)

This paper provides an overview of asylum migration from poor strife-prone countries to the OECD since the 1950s. I examine the political and economic factors in source countries that generate refugees and asylum seekers. Particular attention is given to the rising trend of asylum applications up to the 1990s, and the policy backlash that followed. I consider the political economy of restrictive asylum policies, especially in EU countries, as well as the effectiveness of those policies in deterring asylum seekers. The paper concludes with an outline of the assimilation of refugees in host country labour markets.

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File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp7004.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7004.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: A. F. Constant, K. F. Zimmermann (eds.), International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, Edward Elgar 2013, Cheltenham, UK, and Northampton, USA, Chapter 24, 453-469
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7004
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  1. Edin, P.-A. & Fredriksson, P. & Aslund, O., 2000. "Settlement Policies and the Economic Success of Immigrants," Papers 2000-22, Uppsala - Working Paper Series.
  2. Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael, 1999. "The Effects of Development on Migration: Theoretical Issues and New Empirical Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 46, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. TimothyJ. Hatton, 2009. "The Rise and Fall of Asylum: What Happened and Why?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(535), pages F183-F213, 02.
  4. Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1997. "South-North Refugee Migration: Lessons for Development Cooperation," CEPR Discussion Papers 1578, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Anna Damm & Michael Rosholm, 2010. "Employment effects of spatial dispersal of refugees," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 105-146, March.
  6. Anna Piil Damm, 2006. "Ethnic Enclaves and Immigrant Labour Market Outcomes: Quasi-Experimental Evidence," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0607, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  7. Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2011. "Immigrant selection and short-term labor market outcomes by visa category," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 451-475, April.
  8. Hatton, Timothy J., 2005. "European Asylum Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 1721, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Joop Hartog & Aslan Zorlu, 2009. "How important is homeland education for refugees’ economic position in The Netherlands?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 219-246, January.
  10. Åslund, Olof & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2003. "Do when and where matter? Initial labor market conditions and immigrant earnings," Working Paper Series 2003:7, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  11. Teitelbaum, Michael S., 1984. "Immigration, refugees, and foreign policy," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(03), pages 429-450, June.
  12. Priebe, Stefan & Bogic, Marija & Ashcroft, Richard & Franciskovic, Tanja & Galeazzi, Gian Maria & Kucukalic, Abdulah & Lecic-Tosevski, Dusica & Morina, Nexhmedin & Popovski, Mihajlo & Roughton, Michae, 2010. "Experience of human rights violations and subsequent mental disorders - A study following the war in the Balkans," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(12), pages 2170-2177, December.
  13. Timothy J. Hatton, 2004. "Seeking asylum in Europe," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 19(38), pages 5-62, 04.
  14. Christina Boswell, 2007. "Migration Control in Europe After 9/11: Explaining the Absence of Securitization," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45, pages 589-610, 09.
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