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The Economics and Politics of Refugee Migration

Author

Listed:
  • Christian Dustman

    () (University College London)

  • Francesco Fasani Fasani

    (Queen Mary)

  • Tommaso Frattini

    (Università degli Studi di Milano)

  • Luigi Minale

    () (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

  • Uta Schӧnberg

    (University College London)

Abstract

This paper provides a comprehensive review and analysis of refugee migration, with emphasis on the current refugee crisis. After first reviewing the institutional framework laid out by the Geneva Convention for Refugees, we demonstrate that, despite numerous attempts at developing a common European asylum policy, EU countries continue to differ widely in interpretation and implementation. We then describe key features of the current refugee crisis and document the overall magnitudes and types of refugee movements, illegal border crossings, and asylum applications to EU member states. We next turn to the economics of refugee migrations, contrasting economic and refugee migrants, discussing the trade-offs between long-term asylum and temporary protection, and highlighting the economic advantages of increasingly coordinating the different national asylum policies. Finally, we illustrate the economic integration of past refugee migrants to EU countries and conclude with several policy recommendations.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Dustman & Francesco Fasani Fasani & Tommaso Frattini & Luigi Minale & Uta Schӧnberg, 2016. "The Economics and Politics of Refugee Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1616, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  • Handle: RePEc:crm:wpaper:1616
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    File URL: http://www.cream-migration.org/publ_uploads/CDP_16_16.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Per-Anders Edin & Peter Fredriksson & Olof Åslund, 2003. "Ethnic Enclaves and the Economic Success of Immigrants—Evidence from a Natural Experiment," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(1), pages 329-357.
    2. Timothy J. Hatton, 2015. "Asylum Policy in the EU: the Case for Deeper Integration," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(3-4), pages 605-637.
    3. Christian Dustman & Kristine Vasiljeva & Anna Piil Damm, 2016. "Refugee Migration and Electoral Outcomes," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1619, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. TimothyJ. Hatton, 2009. "The Rise and Fall of Asylum: What Happened and Why?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(535), pages 183-213, February.
    5. Dustmann, Christian, 1999. " Temporary Migration, Human Capital, and Language Fluency of Migrants," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(2), pages 297-314, June.
    6. Brian Bell & Francesco Fasani & Stephen Machin, 2013. "Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(4), pages 1278-1290, October.
    7. Christian Dustmann & Joseph-Simon Görlach, 2016. "The Economics of Temporary Migrations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 98-136, March.
    8. Jesús Fernández-Huertas Moraga & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Tradable Refugee-admission Quotas (TRAQs), the Syrian Crisis and the new European Agenda on Migration," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-13, December.
    9. Jesús Fernández-Huertas Moraga & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Tradable Refugee-admission Quotas and EU Asylum Policy," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(3-4), pages 638-672.
    10. Yoram Ben-Porath, 1967. "The Production of Human Capital and the Life Cycle of Earnings," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75, pages 352-352.
    11. Anna Piil Damm, 2009. "Ethnic Enclaves and Immigrant Labor Market Outcomes: Quasi-Experimental Evidence," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 281-314, April.
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    14. Dustmann, Christian, 2000. "Temporary Migration and Economic Assimilation," IZA Discussion Papers 186, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    17. Kalena E. Cortes, 2004. "Are Refugees Different from Economic Immigrants? Some Empirical Evidence on the Heterogeneity of Immigrant Groups in the United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(2), pages 465-480, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stähler, Nikolai, 2017. "A model-based analysis of the macroeconomic impact of the refugee migration to Germany," Discussion Papers 05/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    2. Graziella Bertocchi & Arcangelo Dimico & Francesco Lancia & Alessia Russo, 2017. "Youth Enfranchisement, Political Responsiveness, and Education Expenditure: Evidence from the U.S," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 130, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    3. Xenia Frei & Jan Kluge, 2016. "Die Wohnsitzauflage als kostspielige Integrationsbremse für Flüchtlinge," ifo Dresden berichtet, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 23(06), pages 30-34, December.
    4. Bratti, Massimiliano & Deiana, Claudio & Havari, Enkelejda & Mazzarella, Gianluca & Meroni, Elena Claudia, 2017. "What Are You Voting For? Proximity to Refugee Reception Centres and Voting in the 2016 Italian Constitutional Referendum," IZA Discussion Papers 11060, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Marina Murat, 2017. "Foreign Aid and responsiveness of bilateral refugee inflows," Department of Economics 0113, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    6. Marina Murat, 2017. "Foreign aid and asylum immigration. Does development matter?," Department of Economics 0120, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    7. repec:ces:ifodic:v:14:y:2017:i:4:p:19271454 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Marina Murat, 2017. "Foreign aid and asylum immigration. Does development matter?," Center for Economic Research (RECent) 133, University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    9. Michael Wyrwich, 2018. "Migration restrictions and long-term regional development: evidence from large-scale expulsions of Germans after World War II," Jena Economic Research Papers 2018-002, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    10. Alessandra Casarico & Giovanni Facchini & Cecilia Testa, 2017. "Asylum Policy and Illegal Immigration: Perspectives and Challenges," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 14(4), pages 14-20, 02.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    asylum policy; asylum seekers; refugee crisis;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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