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Immigration and the Diffusion of Technology: The Huguenot Diaspora in Prussia

  • Erik Hornung

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This paper analyzes long-term effects of skilled-worker immigration on productivityfor the Huguenots migration to Prussia. We combine Huguenot immigration lists from1700 with Prussian firm-level data on the value of inputs and outputs in 1802 in aunique data base. In 1685, religious persecution drove highly skilled Huguenots out ofFrance into backward Brandenburg-Prussia where they were channeled into towns tocompensate population losses due to plagues during the Thirty Years’ War. Exploitingthis settlement pattern in an instrumental-variable approach, we still find causal effectsof Huguenot settlement on the productivity of textile manufactories hundred years aftertheir immigration.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-Ifo_Working_Papers/wp-ifo-2011/IfoWorkingPaper-114.pdf
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Paper provided by Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich in its series Ifo Working Paper Series with number Ifo Working Paper No. 114.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_114
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  1. Paserman, M. Daniele, 2008. "Do High-Skill Immigrants Raise Productivity? Evidence from Israeli Manufacturing Firms, 1990-1999," IZA Discussion Papers 3572, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Johan Fourie & Dieter von Fintel, 2011. "Settler skills and colonial development," Working Papers 213, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  3. Annekatrin Niebuhr, 2010. "Migration and innovation: Does cultural diversity matter for regional R&D activity?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(3), pages 563-585, 08.
  4. Sascha O. Becker & Ludger Woessmann, 2009. "Was Weber Wrong? A Human Capital Theory of Protestant Economic History," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(2), pages 531-596, May.
  5. Rachel M. Friedberg & J. Hunt, 1995. "The Impact of Immigrants on Host Country Wages, Employment and Growth," Working Papers 95-5, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  6. Timothy J. Hatton, 2010. "The Cliometrics Of International Migration: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 941-969, December.
  7. Botticini, Maristella & Eckstein, Zvi, 2004. "Jewish Occupational Selection: Education, Restrictions, or Minorities?," IZA Discussion Papers 1224, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Sascha O. Becker & Erik Hornung & Ludger Woessmann, 2011. "Education and Catch-Up in the Industrial Revolution," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 92-126, July.
  9. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Paul Levine & Emanuela Lotti & Joseph Pearlman, 2003. "The Immigration Surplus Revisited in a General Equilibrium Model with Endogenous Growth," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0203, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  11. Vandenbussche, Jérôme & Aghion, Philippe & Meghir, Costas, 2006. "Growth, distance to frontier and composition of human capital," Scholarly Articles 12490648, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  12. Chiswick, Carmel U. & Chiswick, Barry R. & Karras, Georgios, 1992. "The impact of immigrants on the macroeconomy," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 279-316, December.
  13. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521840095 is not listed on IDEAS
  14. Stephan R. Epstein, 2004. "Property Rights to Technical Knowledge in Premodern Europe, 1300-1800," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 382-387, May.
  15. Pamuk, Sevket, 2007. "The Black Death and the origins of the across Europe, 1300 1600," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(03), pages 289-317, December.
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