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Immigration in American Economic History

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  • Ran Abramitzky
  • Leah Boustan

Abstract

The United States has long been perceived as a land of opportunity for immigrants. Yet, both in the past and today, US natives have expressed concern that immigrants fail to integrate into US society and lower wages for existing workers. This paper reviews the literatures on historical and contemporary migrant flows, yielding new insights on migrant selection, assimilation of immigrants into US economy and society, and the effect of immigration on the labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan, 2017. "Immigration in American Economic History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1311-1345, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1311-45
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.20151189
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:exehis:v:68:y:2018:i:c:p:95-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen, 2016. "National Immigration Quotas and Local Economic Growth," Discussion Papers 16-11, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    3. Xie, Bin, 2017. "The Effects of Immigration Quotas on Wages, the Great Black Migration, and Industrial Development," IZA Discussion Papers 11214, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. repec:eee:exehis:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:37-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:oup:ereveh:v:22:y:2018:i:1:p:1-27. is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Callaway, Brantly & Collins, William J., 2018. "Unions, workers, and wages at the peak of the American labor movement," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 95-118.
    7. Peter Grajzl & Jonathan Eastwood & Valentina Dimitrova-Grajzl, 2017. "Should Immigrants Culturally Assimilate or Preserve Their Own Culture? Individual Beliefs and the Longevity of National Identity," CESifo Working Paper Series 6470, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Larkin, Matthew P. & Askarov, Zohid & Doucouliagos, Chris & Dubelaar, Chris & Klona, Maria & Newton, Joshua & Stanley, T. D. & Vocino, Andrea, 2018. "Do House Prices Sink or Ride the Wave of Immigration?," IZA Discussion Papers 11497, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Rohan Alexander & Zachary Ward, 2018. "Age at Arrival and Assimilation during the Age of Mass Migration," CEH Discussion Papers 03, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • N31 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N32 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-

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